Software Architecture Using Angular

Angular 2 has grown steadily more popular since its release, and a growing number of books are now available to teach programmers how to use it. But building an application involves a lot more than just writing code: in order to be performant and maintainable, the application must have some over-arching architectural plan that ties its pieces together and gives direction to future growth.
To help with this, Rangle has started to assemble a guide to software architecture using Angular 2. How should sets of components be organized so that they can easily be tested and re-used? How can Angular 2 be combined with tools like Redux to simplify state management in an asynchronous, event-driven world? How can we design today to make server-side rendering less painful to add tomorrow (and should we be doing SSR at all)? Sooner or later, every growing application has to wrestle with these issues; our aim is to distill expert knowledge so that people can make the right decisions early on.
The first chapter of this new guide, based on work by Daniel Figueiredo and Renee Vrantsidis, is now available. We would be grateful for feedback on its content and format, and for suggestions about other topics the community would like to see covered. And if you are interested in contributing, please get in touch: as always, we are smarter together than any one of us is alone.

Link: http://blog.rangle.io/software-architecture-using-angular/

Latest Version of Selenium has Been Unveiled With a lot of New Features and Integrations

It is quite shocking to hear that Selenium is 11 years old. Jason Huggins developed Selenium back in 2004 at ThoughtWorks. In the earlier stages, it was utilized as a tool in a few projects which were developed internally. A lot has changed since then but not just in Selenium alone. “Automation of Tools in a Browser” is a set of tools which was very difficult and fragile. Selenium simplified the creation of this tool set. These changes and advancements in Selenium led to the generation of a community of open source and commercial tools. Selenium is now the de facto browser tool for testing. It is very hard to believe the fan base and momentum Selenium has acquired over these 10 years and this seems unstoppable due to more exciting features and integrations emerging day-by-day.
Since the Selenium version 2.53.1, there hasn’t been a stable release until the release of Selenium 3.0.0 beta 1 version in October 2016. There was no proper explanation given for so much delay. It may have been due to the shortage of resources to finish the release by that time frame or an important modification in the direction which makes sense as the plan is to eliminate the Selenium core fully in the next release. Possibly, they wanted to give more time to the developers to migrate to utilizing the WebDriver API in favor of the Selenium Core Libraries.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-wait-is-finally-over-and-the-road-map-to-the-l?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev