React vs. Angular vs. Vue.js: A Complete Comparison Guide

Choosing a tech stack sometimes becomes a tedious task as you need to take every factor into consideration, including budget, time, app size, end-users, project objectives, and resources.
Whether you are a beginner, a developer, a freelancer, or a project architect forming strategies, it is a wise decision to be aware of the advantages and drawbacks of each framework in detail. So, this post will not help you select the best one, because that decision depends on the scope of your project and the framework’s suitability to your needs. But, this post can help you gain a better understanding of each framework along with trends and insights.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/react-vs-angular-vs-vuejs-a-complete-comparison-gu?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

AOT Compilation With Bundling in Angular

In the world of web development, developers enjoy developing SPAs (Single Page Applications) using Angular. One of the main reasons behind this is the modular approach of Angular, with the help of which we can separate our client-side scripting codes, like MVC patterns, from the rest of the codebase. But, the most problematic issue is that adding all the JavaScript files into our index.html page is really very painful. Not only that, it decreases the performance of the application since, while loading the index.html file, it tries to download all the JavaScript files, including related HTML files. So, if we assume that our application contains more than 500 components, then we can clearly think of how many files need to download at the beginning. Not only the files related to the components which we developed for the application, but index files download the environmental files related to Angular from the Node Modules. So, in this way, it increases the application network traffic and decreases the performance. So, the most preferred solution is that if we can bundle all the files into a single file, just like other JavaScript-based applications or MVC applications. So, to achieve this, we need to change the compilation process of our Angular applications.
JIT (Just In Time) Compilation
Traditional Angular applications (i.e. developed in Angular 1.x) were normally built using the JIT compilation. Maybe, the developers who mainly code using client-side languages/libraries like JavaScript/jQuery do not know about it or believe that there is no compile-time requirement in the case of script language. But, this is not true. Actually, in the case of JavaScript, there is always a compiler which compiles our code. This does not occur in the development or deployment time. Basically, it occurs on the fly, meaning just before our JavaScript code is going to be loaded by the browser. This process always takes a little bit more time than we think. This compilation process is required for the browsers because the browser does not read or understand any binary languages to execute or run. So, when we load any JavaScript files, those files must first be compiled so the browser can understand them and then execute them. So, AOT compilation process actually switches the compilation process from runtime to build time.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/aot-compilation-with-bundling-in-angular?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Login Page Using Angular Material Design

This is a simple Angular application with a login module designed using Angular 5 Material design. The application will have a login module with a landing page and, after successfully logging in, the user will be redirected to the user page (User Module). To design this we have used Angular 5 Material components such as buttons, layout, mat-toolbar.
Angular 5 Setup
Let’s start with the Angular 5 setup. We will be creating an application using Angular CLI and then will configure the material design with it. We can setup Angular by going through Angular QuickStart.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/angular-5-material-design-login-application?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

High Performance Angular Grid With Web Sockets

You may have come across the requirement to push data in real-time to an Angular Grid. To push data to the browser, you need a technology called WebSocket. You can implement that using Node.js or ASP.NET SignalR. For the purpose of this article, we will use Web Sockets with Node.js.
In the first half of this article, we will create an API which will use Web Sockets to push data to the client, and, in the second half of the article, we will create an Angular application to consume that. In the Angular application, we will use Ignite UI for Angular Grid. However, you can also use a simple HTML table to consume data in real-time from the web socket. In this article, we will learn to consume data in real-time from a Node.js Web Socket in a HTML table as well as Ignite UI Angular Data Grid. We will also look at the difference in performance in these two approaches.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/high-performance-angular-grid-with-web-sockets?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Create Your First Angular Element

Angular Elements allow us to create reusable Angular components, which can be used outside of the Angular application. You can use an Angular Element in any other application, built with HTML, React, etc. Essentially, Angular Elements are normal components, which are packaged as Custom Elements. You can learn more about Custom Elements here.
Angular Elements are reusable components, which can be used outside Angular. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-create-your-first-angular-element?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev