Running an ASP.NET Core Application as a Windows Service

ASP.NET Core 2.1 introduces a new application host for Windows services. We can now run ASP.NET Core applications as Windows services with minimal effort. This blog post introduces how it is done and how to build and run Windows services on ASP.NET Core without any need for dirty hacks.
Creating a Default Web Application
We start with new default ASP.NET Core 2.1 web application.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/running-aspnet-core-application-as-windows-service?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Creating a Signature Pad Using Canvas and ASP.NET Core Razor Pages

In one of our projects, we needed to add the possibility to add signatures to PDF documents. A technician fills out a checklist online and a responsible person and the technician need to sign the checklist afterward. The signatures then get embedded into a generated PDF document together with the results of the checklist. The signatures must be created on a web UI, running on an iPad Pro.
It was pretty clear that we needed to use the HTML5 canvas element and to capture the pointer movements. Fortunately, we stumbled upon a pretty cool library on GitHub, created by Szymon Nowak from Poland. It is the super awesome Signature Pad written in TypeScript and available as an NPM and Yarn package. It is also possible to use a CDN to use the Signature Pad.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/creating-a-signature-pad-using-canvas-and-aspnet-c?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

A Direct Comparison of WCF and ASP.NET Core Functionalities

A lot of money and energy was invested by Microsoft to develop ASP.NET Core. This is an open source platform to which features and services can be added by the wider developer community. Some assume that ASP.NET Core has multiple advantages over other open source platforms like WCF. But this is not always the case; let’s have a close look at the matter. In this article, our main focus is to compare the performance of WCF (Windows Communication Foundation) and ASP.NET Core, so that you can decide for yourself which technology is best for you. To judge the performance of both the platforms, let us take a simple example – “stand up a local web server.” Let’s check how much time it takes for the web server to generate a request, how much time it takes to route the request, serialize the request, to create a response, and send the response back and deserialize it.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/a-direct-comparison-of-wcf-and-aspnet-core-functio?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Using the Angular Material Paginator With ASP.NET Core and Angular

Code
You can find the code here: https://github.com/FabianGosebrink/ASPNETCore-Angular-Material-HATEOAS-Paging
Get Started
With the Angular Material Table and its Pagination Module, it is quite easy to set up paging in a beautiful way so that you can use it on the client-side and only show a specific amount of entries to your users. What we do not want to do is load all the items from the backend in the first place just to get the paging going and then display only a specific amount. Instead, we want to load only what we need and display that. If the user clicks on the “next page” button, the items should be loaded and displayed.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/using-the-angular-material-paginator-with-aspnet-c?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

CRUD Operations in Angular With ASP.NET Core and HATEOAS

A Quick Note
The HATEOAS in this repository does not follow any “standard” like HAL, for example. But it is enough that you get the idea and an impression how to use it.
I just played around a little bit and maybe you can get some inspiration of how to get stuff going with that in your project. This is only one approach. I would love to hear yours in the comments. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/crud-operations-in-angular-with-aspnet-core-and-ha?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

ASP.NET Core: Using Highcharts With Angular 5

In this article, we will create an online poll application using ASP.NET Core, Angular 5, and Entity Framework Core. Since this is the season of IPL in India, we will create an online poll for “Who is going to win IPL 2018?" The poll results will be displayed as a column chart, that is created using Highcharts.

We will use Visual Studio 2017 and SQL Server 2014.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/aspnet-core-using-highcharts-with-angular-5?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

ASP.NET Core: CRUD With React.js and Entity Framework Core

In this article, we are going to create a web application using ASP.NET Core 2.0 and React.js with the help of the Entity Framework Core database first approach. We will be creating a sample Employee Record Management system and performing CRUD operations on it. To read the inputs from the user, we are using HTML Form elements with required field validations on the client side. We are also going to bind a dropdown list in the HTML Form to a table in the database using EF Core.
We will be using Visual Studio 2017 and SQL Server 2014.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/aspnet-core-crud-with-reactjs-and-entity-framework?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Build Secure User Authentication in ASP.NET Core With OIDC and OAuth

In the age of the “personalized web experience,” authentication and user management is a given, and it’s easier than ever for businesses to tap into third-party authentication providers like Facebook, Twitter, and Google to secure their APIs, and identify users logged into their apps. OpenID Connect (OIDC) is a protocol for authenticating users. It lays out what an Identity Provider needs to provide in order to be considered “OpenID Connect Certified” which makes it easier than ever to consume authentication as a service.
Why Not Use OAuth 2.0?
First, OAuth 2.0 is NOT an authentication protocol. I know what you’re thinking: “What?!!?” But it’s not. It is a delegated authorization framework, which many modern authentication protocols are built on.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/build-secure-user-authentication-in-aspnet-core

The ASP.NET Core React Project

In the last post I wrote, I had a first look at a plain, clean, and lightweight React setup. I’m still impressed how easy the setup is and how fast the loading of a React app really is. Before trying to push this setup into an ASP.NET Core application, it would make sense to have a look at the ASP.NET Core React project.
Create the React Project
You can either use the “File New Project …" dialog in Visual Studio 2017 or the .NET CLI to create a new ASP.NET Core React project:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-aspnet-core-react-project?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev