Fixing JavaScript Cross-Browser Compatibility Issues

Out of all major web technologies, there is no other technology as vilified for cross-browser compatibility as JavaScript. Despite the advancements in pure HTML and CSS, it’s true that you cannot easily build web apps or websites without it.
In this article, we look into cross-browser compatibility issues with JavaScript and methodologies to fix the issues. Before we get started with the actual topic of discussion, it is important that we look into the basics and evolution of JavaScript.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/fixing-javascript-cross-browser-compatibility-issu?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Develop a Web Application Compatible With Internet Explorer 11

Developing web pages compatible with Internet Explorer can be tough at times. Even though Internet Explorer’s support was pulled back by Microsoft, it still remains a popular choice among users. Internet Explorer misbehaves with some of the most important components of HTML, be it low-height, margin, or padding.
To achieve a proper fix to this problem, developers can use conditional comments and CSS commands to target browser specific commands. While it is practically impossible to achieve 100% compatibility for Internet Explorer due to its discontinued support and compatibility issues, there are several feasible ways to make sure that the user receives a decent experience. Although there is no way to develop perfectly compatible web pages, here’s a guide on how to develop a web application compatible with Internet Explorer 11 and its other variants. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-develop-a-web-application-compatible-with-i

Write Browser Compatible JavaScript Using Babel

Cross-browser compatibility can simply be summed up as a war between testers and developers versus the world wide web. Sometimes I feel that to achieve browser compatibility, you may need to sell your soul while performing a sacrificial ritual. Even then some API plugins won’t work! I apologize for the mental imagery, but incompatibility issues get me riled up. All this was before I wasn’t familiar with Babel.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/write-browser-compatible-javascript-code-using-bab?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Making Cross-Browser Compatible Vue.js Apps and the Challenges Involved

Since the day the world’s second browser was launched, cross-platform support seems to be one of the major issues faced by designers and developers worldwide. Web developers were already tackling issues such as faster development time, code reusability, accuracy, etc, and were building robust prepackaged frameworks to help in development. So it was no surprise that they added cross-browser compatibility as a major feature of these frameworks. Out of those frameworks, one of the most popular ones is Vue.js and this post is all about cross-browser compatibility in Vue.js apps.
So, what exactly does it mean for an app to be cross-browser compatible? Let’s understand it through an example.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/making-cross-browser-compatible-vuejs-apps-and-cha?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Build a Website Compatible With IE

Internet Explorer within a span of 7 years of its debut captured a market share of 95%, but its share has since crumbled to 3.2%. At present, IE experiences loads of compatibility issues and to add to its troubles, even Microsoft has pulled back all its support from IE’s earlier versions and has shifted its focus to its new browser, Microsoft Edge.
But even in spite of the dropped market share and lack of support, IE still manages to hold considerable ground in the market and, trust me when I say this, even the experience of your tiny percentage of users coming from IE can make or break your brand, making it absolutely critical to test for compatibility issues. Although this is a time when cross-browser compatibility is a big thing, all the browsers still behave differently, even when it comes to how margins and paddings are treated, how fonts are rendered, or how default styles of elements are interpreted, etc. IE itself is loaded with such issues and here I’m going to talk about some of the most prominent ones.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-build-a-cross-browser-compatible-website-wi?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

4 Ways to Choose Which Browsers and Devices to Test

It’s no secret that testing an application solely on the machine it was developed on isn’t the best way to know whether or not it’s cross-compatible.
Once you decide between building or buying a device lab, there still comes the issue of deciding which browsers to test. After all, you can’t test everything.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/4-ways-to-choose-which-browsers-and-devices-to-tes?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev