Working With Crafter Studio’s API

Crafter CMS is a decoupled CMS composed of multiple microservices where content authoring and content delivery capabilities and services are separated into their own distinct, subsystems.

Organizations often want to interact with the content authoring and management system via APIs. In this article, we’ll show the basics of interacting with this API:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/working-with-crafter-studios-api?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Adding a CMS to Your Static Site With Netlify CMS

For nearly seven years I was a CMS implementer and contributor, mostly with Drupal, but occasionally with Joomla! and WordPress. Then about 3 years ago I encountered Jekyll and I had a revelation, a system that let me manage and render content, but in a manner that suited me as a writer, using markup formats such as markdown, reStructuredText, and Asciidoc. Whilst the plain text and version control approach is great for some, and despite best efforts from vendors such as GitHub and GitLab, it’s still not that accessible to less technically minded people. Many projects have attempted to bridge this gap and merge the best of the two worlds, from commercial SaaS providers such as Contentful, Prismic, or CloudCannon to open source options like Cockpit and getmesh.
Just over a year ago, Netlify, the fantastic host for static sites announced ‘Netlify CMS’ and it looked promising, adding a CMS-like interface to the git workflow. I made some initial investigations, but now finally have time for a proper dive into how to set it up and use it.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/adding-a-cms-to-your-static-site-with-netlify-cms?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

The Rise of the Butt-less Website

It seems like all the cool kids have divided themselves into two cliques: the Headless CMS crowd on one side and the Static Site Generator crowd on the other. While I admit those are pretty cool team names, I found myself unable to pick a side. To paraphrase Groucho Marx, “I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member.”

For my own simple blog (which is embarrassingly empty at the moment), a static site …

The Rise of the Butt-less Website is a post from CSS-Tricks

Link: https://css-tricks.com/the-rise-of-the-butt-less-website/

Five Reasons Why You Should Use a Git-based CMS (Part 5 of 5)

In our previous posts we looked at Git-based CMS and its versioning (part 1), distributed repository (part 2), dug in to Git’s underlying mechanics to see how it benefits deployment (part 3), and we looked at how the support for branching (part 4) can help your organization dramatically speed up development and deployment activities. In this post, we’re going to wrap the series up with one final reason you should use a Git-based CMS.
There are so many advantages to the way that we’ve leveraged Git, it’s hard to pick just 5 things to talk about. Because I’ve arrived at our last reason, #5, I want to use this item to speak to something non-technical: familiarity.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/five-reasons-why-you-should-use-a-git-based-cms-pa-4?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Five Reasons Why You Should Use a Git-Based CMS (Part 3 of 5)

Most CMS technologies are what we would call a “coupled CMS." The content authoring and content delivery environments are usually part of the same stack. The act of "going live" with new content or a feature is essentially based on the act of marking a true/false in a database field. There are a lot of problems with coupled CMS platforms around security, performance, scalability, and flexibility (you can learn more here.)
For these reasons and many others, Crafter CMS is built as a decoupled CMS. With a decoupled CMS you author content in one system and publish to another separate system. For platforms like Crafter CMS that are decoupled, when correctly implemented, the architecture provides great solutions for the issues mentioned above. That said, nothing is without its challenges. Decoupled systems, by their nature, are typically very scalable and can have many instances all over the world. Security, scalability, and distribution are no longer issues that only concern the Internet’s biggest players like Google and Amazon. Security and distribution impact customer experience, safety and help reduce operating costs. Every brand-conscious and customer-forward organization in the world is focused on these tactical issues.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/five-reasons-why-you-should-use-a-git-based-cms-pa-2?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Five Reasons Why You Should Use a Git-Based CMS (Part 2 of 5)

Since the birth of content management system (CMS) technology, well over 20 years ago, platforms have been leveraging “obvious backends" like SQL databases as a store for the content. Not because it’s the best or right store for the job, but because SQL databases are a commonly available, simple to use technology that (kinda) gets the job done. By the early 2000s, it was clear with many implementations that directly leveraged SQL and similar database stores do not provide the full range of features like versioning that a CMS requires. They can’t. They were not built to do it. The Java Content Repository (JCR) and other similar technologies entered the scene. The implementations of these technologies sit on top of the same old database stores and add a layer of capability to fill the gaps. This is good but not good enough. Ultimately, the fact that they sit on top of a database comes back to haunt them.
In Part 1, we looked at what kind versioning model is needed to support modern digital experiences. Today, we focus on another critical capability that is missing in traditional CMS solutions: a distributed repository. More specifically, distributed versioning and workflow.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/five-reasons-why-you-should-use-a-git-based-cms-pa-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Five Reasons Why You Should Use a Git-Based CMS (Part 1 of 5)

Traditional CMS platforms like Drupal, WordPress, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, and most others either have severely limited versioning or provide basic versioning capabilities that track single object graphs or maintain clunky data structures to track relationships.
Figure 1: Single file versioning model. Each object has its own version tree. How and whether relationships are tracked between objects differ from one system to the next.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/five-reasons-why-you-should-use-a-git-based-cms-pa?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Match Highlighting for Search in Crafter CMS

Highlighting search terms in search results is a common requirement for many websites.  Crafter CMS builds on top of Apache Solr and makes implementing rich search and other query-driven experiences super simple.
Step 0: Prerequisites
If you haven’t gotten Crafter CMS set up and built your first site you can follow this tutorial to get started: Working with Your First Crafter CMS Web site.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/match-highlighting-for-search-in-crafter-cms?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How Different CMS’s Handle Content Blocks

Imagine a very simple blog. Blog posts are just a title and a paragraph or three. In that case, having a CMS where you enter the title and those paragraphs and hit publish is perfect. Perhaps some metadata like the date and author come along for the ride. I’m gonna stick my neck out here and say that title-and-content fields only is a CMS anti-pattern. It’s powerful in its flexibility but causes long-term pain in lack of control through abstraction.…

How Different CMS’s Handle Content Blocks is a post from CSS-Tricks

Link: https://css-tricks.com/different-cmss-handle-content-blocks/