Creating Spacers with Flexbox

I was one of the biggest fans of flexbox before it hit but, due to being shuffled around at Mozilla, I never had the chance to use it in any practice project; thus, flexbox still seems like a bit of a mystery to me.  This greatly pains me because I feel left out of the […]
The post Creating Spacers with Flexbox appeared first on David Walsh Blog.

Link: https://davidwalsh.name/flexbox-spacer

CSS Blend Mode

Usually, when adding an image to a website, the first thing we do is edit the image in an external software, such as Photoshop. Does the blend mode eliminate the need to use this kind of software? Not really. But, it in a lot of cases you will be able to add effects to the image directly with CSS.
When creating your design, you should follow some best practice advice.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/css-blend-mode?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

16 Best Practices for Shared UI Libraries

Recently, the New Relic Core UI team moved to React v16.0. In support of this move, we’ve had to upgrade a handful of shared UI libraries owned by teams across the company. As most of us know, upgrading cross-company dependencies can be quite the challenge, and it takes a lot of time.
Often, during such work, we find that UI libraries are not always in the best shape for sharing. To that end, I’ve put together this list of some best practices and recommendations for building shareable UI libraries. For clarity, I’ve grouped the recommendations in three critical categories: CSS, JavaScript, and packaging and distribution.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/16-best-practices-for-shared-ui-libraries

Why would you do that in CSS?

Have you seen Lynn Fisher’s extraordinary A Single Div project? Not only are all these graphics drawn in just HTML and CSS, they are all created with (you guessed it) a single
.
Why would she do that? Here’s one pertinent possibility: it’s none of our business. We’re free to wonder, or even ask if it’s done respectfully enough. But does it really matter? Let’s stop short of assuming she doesn’t know what’s she’s doing, assuming it’s a twisted form of pain, or that she’s unaware of other technologies. Check out the example where she drew the official SVG logo with CSS and a single div. Woke.
The post Why would you do that in CSS? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: https://css-tricks.com/why-would-you-do-that-in-css/

Scooped Corners in 2018

When I saw Chris’ article on notched boxes, I remembered that I got a challenge a while ago to CSS a design like it, but with rounded, scooped corners instead. So, let’s see how we can do it that way instead and expand it to multiple corners while being mindful of browser support.
The post Scooped Corners in 2018 appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: https://css-tricks.com/scooped-corners-in-2018/

CSS Clear Float

A little while ago we wrote about the float property. So, now is a good time to explain the clear property.
The clear property is directly related to the float property. It specifies if an element should be next to the floated elements or if it should move below them. This property applies to both floated and non-floated elements.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/css-clear-float

Sass Mixins

This is the third post about specific Sass features and this one is about mixins. The previous posts were about the import feature and the extend feature (and there was one about nesting in general).
The feature under discussion today, mixin, is used in specific situations. While you won’t need it too often, it’s still good to know.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/sass-mixins?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev