New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Introducing Text Editors & Express Basics

Every week, new courses and workshops are published to the growing Treehouse Library! Here’s a short list of what we’ve added recently, upcoming course highlights, and our weekly video update of What’s New at Treehouse. Start learning to code today…
The post New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Introducing Text Editors & Express Basics appeared first on Treehouse Blog.

Link: http://blog.teamtreehouse.com/new-upcoming-course-highlights-text-editors-express-basics

Faster Page Load Using Lightweight CSS and SVG Animation (Without JavaScript)

Including animations on a web page is an exciting process. However exciting, it can be also an expensive process for your users. Common web animation tools, while effective, can create a lot of frontend bloat with large JavaScript animation libraries and multiple file requests for source images.
The end result (while pretty) can leave your user spending precious time waiting for the page to load. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/faster-page-load-using-lightweight-css-and-svg-ani?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Java HTML Templating With Handlebars and Undertow

Researching how to create a website in Java can be a daunting task. A few Google searches and you end up with tons of libraries and strong opinions. JSP, JSF, Spring MVC, GWT, Vaadin and many more. All of them seem like they have quite a learning curve. All we really need is to pass an object to a template and render some HTML, nothing fancy. Let’s take this a step further and follow the node/express approach of simply plugging in an HTML templating engine. Enter Handlebars – a perfect, fairly simple syntax added to plain HTML anyone should be able to pick up immediately (Yes, MVC frameworks can use this also, but do we need a framework for what a single class can do?). It also conveniently has ports in many languages. This means we can use the same templates client-side (JavaScript) and server-side if we want.
HTML Templating Utility
This is a rare case where we decided to make a simple abstraction hiding the underlying jknack handlebars implementation. Since it only really needs a few methods, we can hide the implementation and easily swap it out later. Notice how we have a few config options. When we are running locally, we want handlebars templates to be compiled on the fly and NOT cached. We also utilize HTML compression for all of the HTML-specific methods. We also offer some non-HTML templating methods. Sometimes it might make sense to abuse an HTML templating library to solve a similar problem.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/java-html-templating-with-handlebars-and-undertow?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Three New Products Help Developers With PDFs

pdfHTML to Convert HTML and CSS to PDF
An iText 7 add-on, pdfHTML is a premium upgrade to the previous XML Worker from iText 5. The new solution provides more functionality out of the box and easier extensibility and customization.
“HTML is ubiquitous. A lot of software already outputs HTML in one way or another, and most developers know at least the basics,” said Raf Hens, iText director of product management. “As such, pdfHTML is a convenient way to integrate PDF functionality, allowing developers to use existing HTML and CSS skills and resources to quickly create PDF documents.”

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/three-new-products-help-developers-with-pdfs?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Python: Flask – Generating a Static HTML Page

Whenever I need to quickly spin up a web application, Python’s Flask library is my go to tool. Recently, however, I found myself wanting to generate a static HTML page to upload to S3 and wondered if I could use it for that as well.
It’s actually not too tricky. If we’re in the scope of the app context then we have access to the template rendering that we’d normally use when serving the response to a web request.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-flask-generating-a-static-html-page?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Go From Zero to Serverless with Backand, Part 3

In our last article (Part 2), we fleshed out the requirements for our application, built a data schema, and developed a relatively simple UI to manage our to-do list. With the preparation work done, we’re finally ready to tie everything together. In this article, we’ll take it a step further by adding in dynamic population functionality using JavaScript. We’ll include the dependencies we need to get the project off the ground, look at configuring and using the Backand SDK, then we’ll use jQuery to drive our UI population.
Adding Dependencies
As mentioned in our previous article, we’ll be building out our UI using jQuery. This will impose some responsiveness limitations as we near the end of the project, but for the time being we should be able to make do, as our project is relatively simple. The primary way in which this will manifest is that there will be some hard-coding of HTML in the JavaScript code that, in a framework like React or Angular, would be handled for you. In the final article of this series, we’ll look at some alternative UI frameworks that can be used to simplify this kind of effort.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-go-from-zero-to-serverless-with-backand-par-3?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Go From Zero to Serverless With Backand, Part 2

In Part 1 of this series, we looked at serverless architecture and what it means for web development. We also looked at Backand and creating an account to work with our to-do List application. In this article, we’ll build our application’s data model by walking through a simple set of requirements. We’ll implement the data model in Backand, then work on building a simple UI to present our data to the user.
Defining Our Requirements
Common software development wisdom is that changing requirements becomes an order of magnitude more challenging as you move through the development process. While a change at design time might have some frustrating repercussions, on average it would cost ten times as much to make the exact same change once design has completed and implementation has begun, and one hundred times as much once development is completed and we’re ready to deploy to production. In recognition of this, let’s spend some time defining the requirements of our application:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-go-from-zero-to-serverless-with-backand-par-2?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Create a Responsive, Filterable Portfolio

As a web developer, I usually read questions on StackOverflow or Quora to see what kind of challenges people have faced and want to find an easier solution. One of the most popular challenges which I’ve noticed was developing a portfolio with a filter. In this article, you will learn how to develop a portfolio with a filter by using Bootstrap. Here are the several steps that we should follow to get our portfolio ready. 
1. Create a Link for Each Category   
 First, we need to create a link for every single category in our HTML file.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-create-a-responsive-filterable-portfolio?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev