Mobile-Orientated Architecture (MOA)

Update From the (Near) Future
This post was written looking back from the future of the 2020s, making some assumptions about what kinds of changes we’d see in tech and the progress of the Kotlin ecosystem. Well, it’s been almost a year, and so far our timing looks pretty good. Kotlin Multiplatform is entering production. Mutiplatform libraries are being released. We, Touchlab, have completely shifted gears from Doppl, referenced below, and are fully committed to a Kotlin Multiplatform future.
Last year, MOA and Kotlin were a little speculative. A year later, it is happening. The time to take a deeper look is now.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/mobile-orientated-architecture-moa?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Working With iOS App Metadata From Linux Using Transporter

Apple announced a new AppStore Connect API at WWDC18 to communicate directly with the App Store. In order to know more about this API, refer to my previous blog post. This was clearly huge and game-changing announcement but Apple also announced other things which might get unnoticed at WWDC sessions on What’s New in App Store Connect, such as support for the Transporter tool on Linux platforms. This means that we can now use Linux servers to upload and validate iOS app metadata and previews. In this post, we will explore how we might use Linux servers to deal with the App Store using the Transporter tool.
iTMSTransporter
Before jumping into Linux, let’s explore what Transporter is and how it’s being used on macOS servers at the moment. The transporter tool is also known as iTMSTrasporter. An iTMSTransporter stands for iTunes Music Store Transporter, which is Apple’s Java-based command-line tool to upload app binaries, upload screenshots, update app metadata, manage app pricing, manage in-app purchases, etc. This utility comes with Xcode so there’s no need to install it explicitly as long as you have Xcode. The binary can be found here:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/working-with-ios-app-metadata-from-linux-using-tra?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Introducing Lima

After nearly four years and over 500 stars on GitHub, I’ve decided it’s time to retire MarkupKit. Despite a respectable level of developer interest, the idea of building an application using XML never seemed to fully resonate with the broader iOS community.
However, even in the absence of a markup-based implementation, the concept of declarative UI is still highly applicable. Today I am happy to introduce Lima, a new Swift-based DSL for constructing iOS and tvOS applications. The project’s name comes from the nautical L or Lima flag, representing the first letter of the word “layout":

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/introducing-lima?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Quick Tip: Debug iOS Safari on a true local emulator (or your actual iPhone/iPad)

We’ve been able to do this for years, largely for free (ignoring the costs of the computer and devices), but I’m not sure as many people know about it as they should.
TL;DR: XCode comes with a “Simulator" program you can pop open to test in virtual iOS devices. If you then open Safari’s Develop/Debug menu, you can use its DevTools to inspect right there — also true if you plug in your real iOS device.
Direct Link to Article…
The post Quick Tip: Debug iOS Safari on a true local emulator (or your actual iPhone/iPad) appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: http://mediatemple.net/blog/tips/quick-tip-debug-ios-safari-true-local-emulator-actual-iphoneipad/