Working With iOS App Metadata From Linux Using Transporter

Apple announced a new AppStore Connect API at WWDC18 to communicate directly with the App Store. In order to know more about this API, refer to my previous blog post. This was clearly huge and game-changing announcement but Apple also announced other things which might get unnoticed at WWDC sessions on What’s New in App Store Connect, such as support for the Transporter tool on Linux platforms. This means that we can now use Linux servers to upload and validate iOS app metadata and previews. In this post, we will explore how we might use Linux servers to deal with the App Store using the Transporter tool.
iTMSTransporter
Before jumping into Linux, let’s explore what Transporter is and how it’s being used on macOS servers at the moment. The transporter tool is also known as iTMSTrasporter. An iTMSTransporter stands for iTunes Music Store Transporter, which is Apple’s Java-based command-line tool to upload app binaries, upload screenshots, update app metadata, manage app pricing, manage in-app purchases, etc. This utility comes with Xcode so there’s no need to install it explicitly as long as you have Xcode. The binary can be found here:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/working-with-ios-app-metadata-from-linux-using-tra?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Introducing Lima

After nearly four years and over 500 stars on GitHub, I’ve decided it’s time to retire MarkupKit. Despite a respectable level of developer interest, the idea of building an application using XML never seemed to fully resonate with the broader iOS community.
However, even in the absence of a markup-based implementation, the concept of declarative UI is still highly applicable. Today I am happy to introduce Lima, a new Swift-based DSL for constructing iOS and tvOS applications. The project’s name comes from the nautical L or Lima flag, representing the first letter of the word “layout":

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/introducing-lima?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Quick Tip: Debug iOS Safari on a true local emulator (or your actual iPhone/iPad)

We’ve been able to do this for years, largely for free (ignoring the costs of the computer and devices), but I’m not sure as many people know about it as they should.
TL;DR: XCode comes with a “Simulator" program you can pop open to test in virtual iOS devices. If you then open Safari’s Develop/Debug menu, you can use its DevTools to inspect right there — also true if you plug in your real iOS device.
Direct Link to Article…
The post Quick Tip: Debug iOS Safari on a true local emulator (or your actual iPhone/iPad) appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: http://mediatemple.net/blog/tips/quick-tip-debug-ios-safari-true-local-emulator-actual-iphoneipad/

Error Monitoring in iOS

In mobile apps, it’s important to monitor errors so you can understand your user’s experience. Your team should know quickly when there are problems with the app itself or your backend services so you can fix the issue before more customers are affected. We’ll show you how to handle errors in iOS apps. We’ll then show you how Rollbar error monitoring can give you better visibility into errors and help you troubleshoot them faster.
Native Error Handling in iOS
There are multiple ways to implement exception handling in Objective-C and Swift. We’ll focus on Swift in our examples as its a newer language. You’ll commonly use NSError to create runtime errors and use do-catch statements to handle them:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/error-monitoring-in-ios?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Will React Native Mark the Demise of Native App Development?

You can use your existing web development skills and can produce native iOS and Android app using those skills. It’s completely possible to utilize your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript skills to develop native Android and iOS apps.
I’m not talking about the hybrid apps or just an app wrapper on a mobile website but actual native apps. Pure, native apps that you design in iOS using Swift or in Android using Java or Kotlin, they are pure apps and they are developed with common web technologies: HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/will-react-native-mark-the-demise-of-native-app-de

iOS Developers’ Alert: Apple Unleashes the Power of Progressive Web Apps

Technology giant Apple Inc. is in an endeavor to extend support for web apps in its default browser Safari. Experts are already working to introduce support for Service Workers in this browser. This move from Apple is a clear hint that they are moving ahead with the growing concept of Progressive Web Apps (PWA). 
How will the extended support of Service Workers in Safari browser impact enterprises? Are mobile apps being challenged by progressive web apps for the iOS platform? How does the future of iOS app development for the App Store look after this move by Apple? Let’s dig deeper to understand the intention behind this massive move by Apple.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/ios-developers-alert-apple-unleashes-the-power-of?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

B-Wom Case Study: Pure MVP Application

One of the most important tasks that we carry out at Apiumhub is to collaborate with our clients for the implementation of Agile development methodologies and the introduction of good software development practices (software architecture, testing, etc.). Today I would like to focus on the Pure MVP architecture that we implemented in the B-wom app.
Working With Legacy Code
Many times, the projects that we usually get at Apiumhub contain a great amount of legacy code and our primary task is to help our clients with the improvement of the code, the implementation of new functionalities and the improvement of the packaging and distribution system.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/b-wom-case-study-pure-mvp-application?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

A Faster Way to Add Image Assets to Your Xamarin.iOS Project in Visual Studio 2017

While Visual Studio has an editor that can help to add new image assets to a project, it is pretty slow when adding a bunch of new images. If you have to add a lot of images to add, it even crashes once in while, which can be annoying. Because I was in the process of adding more than a hundred images for porting my first app ever from a Windows Phone to iOS and Android, I searched for a faster way — and found it.
What’s Going on Under the Hood?
When you add an imageset to your assets structure, Visual Studio does quite some work. These are the steps that are done:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/a-faster-way-to-add-image-assets-to-your-xamarinio?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev