Error Monitoring in iOS

In mobile apps, it’s important to monitor errors so you can understand your user’s experience. Your team should know quickly when there are problems with the app itself or your backend services so you can fix the issue before more customers are affected. We’ll show you how to handle errors in iOS apps. We’ll then show you how Rollbar error monitoring can give you better visibility into errors and help you troubleshoot them faster.
Native Error Handling in iOS
There are multiple ways to implement exception handling in Objective-C and Swift. We’ll focus on Swift in our examples as its a newer language. You’ll commonly use NSError to create runtime errors and use do-catch statements to handle them:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/error-monitoring-in-ios?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Will React Native Mark the Demise of Native App Development?

You can use your existing web development skills and can produce native iOS and Android app using those skills. It’s completely possible to utilize your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript skills to develop native Android and iOS apps.
I’m not talking about the hybrid apps or just an app wrapper on a mobile website but actual native apps. Pure, native apps that you design in iOS using Swift or in Android using Java or Kotlin, they are pure apps and they are developed with common web technologies: HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/will-react-native-mark-the-demise-of-native-app-de

iOS Developers’ Alert: Apple Unleashes the Power of Progressive Web Apps

Technology giant Apple Inc. is in an endeavor to extend support for web apps in its default browser Safari. Experts are already working to introduce support for Service Workers in this browser. This move from Apple is a clear hint that they are moving ahead with the growing concept of Progressive Web Apps (PWA). 
How will the extended support of Service Workers in Safari browser impact enterprises? Are mobile apps being challenged by progressive web apps for the iOS platform? How does the future of iOS app development for the App Store look after this move by Apple? Let’s dig deeper to understand the intention behind this massive move by Apple.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/ios-developers-alert-apple-unleashes-the-power-of?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

B-Wom Case Study: Pure MVP Application

One of the most important tasks that we carry out at Apiumhub is to collaborate with our clients for the implementation of Agile development methodologies and the introduction of good software development practices (software architecture, testing, etc.). Today I would like to focus on the Pure MVP architecture that we implemented in the B-wom app.
Working With Legacy Code
Many times, the projects that we usually get at Apiumhub contain a great amount of legacy code and our primary task is to help our clients with the improvement of the code, the implementation of new functionalities and the improvement of the packaging and distribution system.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/b-wom-case-study-pure-mvp-application?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

A Faster Way to Add Image Assets to Your Xamarin.iOS Project in Visual Studio 2017

While Visual Studio has an editor that can help to add new image assets to a project, it is pretty slow when adding a bunch of new images. If you have to add a lot of images to add, it even crashes once in while, which can be annoying. Because I was in the process of adding more than a hundred images for porting my first app ever from a Windows Phone to iOS and Android, I searched for a faster way — and found it.
What’s Going on Under the Hood?
When you add an imageset to your assets structure, Visual Studio does quite some work. These are the steps that are done:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/a-faster-way-to-add-image-assets-to-your-xamarinio?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How I Use Python to Blog From My iPhone

Over the last 12 years, I have been blogging almost uninterruptedly about different subjects (mostly on tech stuff), on different platforms and using a variety of devices and applications. First on desktop and laptop computers, and more recently from iPhone and iPad. This year I went on to try something new and decided to create this blog based on Pelican, a static site generator made with Python. And I got the whole process working on my iPhone, which has become, arguably, my main personal computer. So, how do I publish new content to this blog from my iPhone?
1. I Write Each Article in Markdown
Markdown is a simple syntax that can be easily translated to HTML (and a bunch of other formats), but only requires a simple text editor and allows us to focus on the content. On my Mac, I tend to use either Ulysses, or BBEdit, or VIM, whatever comes to hand. On iPhone, currently, I use Ulysses, Drafts or Working Copy. I may start with Drafts or Ulysses, then copy to Working Copy and go on from there…

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-i-use-python-to-blog-from-my-iphone-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Is learning to code harder than learning Italian? Self-taught mobile developer: Jo Lingenfelter

I recently had the delightful opportunity to chat with iOS Techdegree graduate Joanna (Jo) Lingenfelter. As a fellow person who entered the tech field with a non-technical degree, I was excited to learn more about her path from earning a…
The post Is learning to code harder than learning Italian? Self-taught mobile developer: Jo Lingenfelter appeared first on Treehouse Blog.

Link: http://blog.teamtreehouse.com/italian-ios