An Introduction to Node.js

Introduction
Node.js is an application framework and sometimes is referred to as a runtime, through which applications are built using the JavaScript programming language. Node.js is well known for its speed, due to the fact that it is non-blocking. Further, being non-blocking means one request does not wait for the other request to finish (i.e it is asynchronous). The asynchronicity is what makes Node.js the framework that it is today in terms of throughput, unlike Java application servers which are mostly blocking each request that is bound to a thread and as soon as there are no more threads available the server almost always stops receiving requests.
In this article, we will discover some aspects of Node.js. We will do so by discussing some topics such as: uses cases of Node.js, how Node.js achieves concurrency, and its main design pattern.  

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/an-introduction-to-nodejs?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Accelerating the Development of Node.js Using OpenShift

In this blog entry, I want to introduce a “different" way to work with OpenShift. In the typical way to deploy a Pod to OpenShift, we have available a set of very useful objects; we have build/image configurations. This takes the pain from us by hiding the details about image construction but, sometimes we just want to see some code running in the cloud. Or we want to see if our service/application is able to interact with nearby services or we have some code but we don’t want to use a git repo just yet. To solve that problem, I will show the concept of InitContainers, and how by being a little bit creative we achieve some cool stuff like deploying our code inside a running container.
Getting Started
This guide is dependent upon you having access to an OpenShift installation or you have installed OpenShift on your local machine using Minishift or using oc cluster up.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/accelerating-the-development-of-nodejs-using-opens?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Who Uses Node.js in Financial Services?

Some of the largest – and most unknown – users of Node.js in the world are in the financial services industry.
In Financial Services, there are some pretty extreme compliance requirements that companies need to meet — and Node.js has proven flexible enough to meet these requirements.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/who-uses-nodejs-in-financial-services?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Simulate Server Responses With Node.js

A few days ago, while I was working on the front-end of a new project, I found myself in a situation where I needed to simulate different responses from the backend to check some functionalities and behavior in different browsers. This has encouraged me to write this articles about the Node.js simulate browser.
At this point, where a vast amount of companies are placing their bets on TDD, functional testing is a mere routine for the server side, but tables do turn on when it comes to the front-end development. With some promising tools in the game (Selenium comes off the top of my head), developers do prefer to leave some testing to ‘humans’ to perform. Why does this happen? Due to a lack of solid support community, or an insufficient number of documentation and guides, maybe. But this discussion is not to be held in this post.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/simulate-server-responses-with-nodejs

Testing Your Frontend Code: Part IV (Integration Testing)

A while ago, a friend of mine, who is just beginning to explore the wonderful world of frontend development, asked me how to start testing her application. Over the phone. I told her that, obviously, I can’t do it over the phone as there is so much to learn about this subject. I promised to send her links to guide her along the way.
And so I sat down at my computer and googled the subject. I found lots of links, which I sent her, but was dissatisfied with the depth of what they were discussing. I could not find a comprehensive guide — from the point of view of a frontend newbie — to testing frontend applications. I could not find a guide that discusses both the theory and the practice and is oriented towards testing frontend applications.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/testing-your-frontend-code-part-iv-integration-tes?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Node.js Crash Course

Introduction
I’ve been doing Node full-time at work and noticed a lot of other people lacking a centralized resource to get up and running quickly. There are a lot of wonderful resources out there for Node that are only a Google search away, but, hopefully, this document should get you coding quickly and help you to communicate effectively with other Node developers.
I’ve tried to write this list in order of the most important things you need to know. Feel free to skip around.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/nodejs-crash-course?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Callback Hell in Nodejs: A Solution With Fiber

Apiumhub developers and any other developers that have worked with Node.js must have encountered a problem when dealing with the asynchronous APIs (I/O) that JavaScript offers; the famous JavaScript Callback. It’s the way JavaScript incorporates responding to events. In this article, I would like to talk about a solution with Fiber when dealing with Node.js Callback Hell. 
Callback Hell in Node.js: JavaScript Callback
A callback is a function, “A,” that is passed to another function, “B,” as a parameter. The function “B” executes the code “A” at some point. The invocation of “A” can be immediate, as in a synchronous callback, or, it can occur later as in an asynchronous callback. It’s actually a simple concept that can be well understood with an example:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/callback-hell-nodejs-a-solution-with-fiber?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Analyze Your Zombie Data With D3 and Node

HBO’s The Walking Dead has a rabid fanbase devoted to the minutiae of each episode, including numerous zombie “walker" deaths.
Qlik Sense is a powerful data processing and visualization software that developers use to analyze and discover insights in all kinds of data, from business intelligence to medical and raw or aggregated IoT sensor data.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/analyze-your-zombie-data-with-d3-and-node?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Using N|Solid With AppDynamics to Monitor Node.js Applications

Making sure your teams are moving quickly is a primary concern when you’re instrumenting performance monitoring with any language, on any platform.
This is especially true with Node.js – it can be nearly impossible to get the raw performance Node.js offers while simultaneously monitoring for application performance. At NodeSource, we’ve accomplished this with N|Solid.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/using-nsolid-with-appdynamics-to-monitor-nodejs-ap?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Asynchronous Programming: A Reply

Recently, Jesse Warden published an article about Asynchronous Programming on DZone which also can be found on his blog. Actually, there are a couple of misleading statements mostly due to the incorrect modification of his examples with JavaScript Promises and async/wait modifications.
A better example of how JavaScript behaves with Node.js is described in “The Node.js Event Loop, Timers, and process.nextTick()." Most of this article applies to browser-hosted JavaScript as well.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/asynchronous-programming-a-reply?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev