PyDev of the Week: Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel

This week we welcome Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel (@emilyemorehouse) as our PyDev of the Week. Emily is the co-founder and Director of Engineering of Cuttlesoft. She recently spoke at PyCascades about Python’s AST. You can get a feel for what projects she is interested in over on her GitHub profile. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-emily-morehouse-valcarcel?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How Python Is Helping to Improve Open Source

Great programmers, architects, and founders always have a clear vision for the future of a programming language before they start building their application. While selecting a particular language for building an application, the most important thing developers consider is how long support for that language will continue to exist and whether it will be easy to transfer their code if the language gradually becomes obsolete. When Facebook was built, PHP was one of the most popular and powerful choices for web development. Although, if you ask the Facebook team to make their now famous website today, they would probably use a language like Ruby, Scala or Python.
Quora, one of the leading question and answer site, was built on Python and their CEO, Adam D’Angelo, has stated that more than 5 years after Quora was developed, he is happy with the choice of language. So what are the key factors that most programmers consider? Dependency upon other stacks is one for sure! A language such as Python has many frameworks and programming models that have improved the open source stack. The Python programming model enables you to write your own open source code which can be purely based on the native Python language. Anyone who codes using Python will tell you that coding in Python is relatively simple compared to some other options. Thus, coding in Python can enhance the reusability as it would be simple to refactor and use it again in different projects. Let’s look at some of the factors, models, and frameworks that will improve Open Source for good.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/this-python-programming-models-will-improve-open-s?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Robert Cimrman

This week we welcome Robert Cimrman as our PyDev of the Week! Robert is the project leader of Sfepy: Simple Finite Elements in Python package. He is also a contributor to NumPy and SciPy. You can see some the projects he works on over on GitHub. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better! Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc.)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-robert-cimrman?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Python Frameworks for Web Developers in 2018

Any techie worth his salt will agree that frameworks make their life easier by allowing for quicker customizations with less code and more focus on logic. As a web developer, you would like a framework that enables you to rapidly develop and deploy applications. When it comes to a web application, there is always more to do than just coding your application. You need to understand the server side architecture and then there will be your application running on a user’s browser which uses JavaScript. We list out five Python frameworks that you might be interested to learn as a web developer. Some of these are the full-stack frameworks, which is not only useful for Python but other languages too.
1. Django:
Django always comes first to mind when we talk about a Python framework because it makes web development ridiculously fast and scalable. The software foundation is established as a non-profit organization and has a lot of senior developers and experts to help you out in case you are stuck. They keep updating the framework to match the latest version of Python. You can get the download and documentation from their own site as open-source software. It supports many database engines and is in use by major web applications like Instagram. As a newbie, you can start with this framework as it also makes learning much easier.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-frameworks-for-web-developer-in-2018?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Use wxPython Demo Code Outside the Demo

Every now and then, someone will ask about how they can run the demo code from wxPython’s demo outside of the demo. In other words, they wonder how you can extract the code from the demo and run it in your own. I think I wrote about this very topic quite some time ago on the wxPython wiki, but I thought I should write on the topic here as well.

What to Do About the Log
The first issue that I always see is that the demo code is riddled with calls to some kind of log. It’s always writing to that log to help the developer see how different events get fired or how different methods get called. This is all well and good, but it makes just copying the code out of the demo difficult. Let’s take the code from the wx.ListBox demo as an example and see if we can make it work outside of the demo. Here is the demo code:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-use-wxpython-demo-code-outside-the-demo?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Christopher Truncer

This week we welcome Christopher Truncer (@ChrisTruncer) as our PyDev of the Week! He is a co-founder and current developer of the Veil-Framework. Christopher basically develops pen-testing utilities in Python. You can see some of what he’s up to over on GitHub or his website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-christopher-truncer?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Christy Heaton

This week we welcome Christy Heaton (@christytoes) as our PyDev of the Week! Christy is a blogger for the Python Software Foundation. You can see what she’s up to via her GitHub page or by checking out her website. Let’s take some time to get to know her better!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-christy-heaton?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Nicholas Hunt-Walker

This week we welcome Nicholas Hunt-Walker (@nhuntwalker) as our PyDev of the Week! Nicholas studied to be an astrophysicist and then decided to switch to teaching programming and software development. You can find out more about what Nicholas is up to over on his website, Rational Whimsey or possibly see him at a Python conference. He is currently booked to speak at PyCascades later this month and PyCaribbean in February. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-nicholas-hunt-walker?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev