Node.js vs. Django:  Is JavaScript Better Than Python?

Node.js (55, 432 ★ on GitHub) and Django (37, 614 ★ on GitHub) are two powerful tools for building web applications.
Node.js has a “JavaScript everywhere” motive to ensure JavaScript is used on the server-side and client-side of web applications and Django has a “framework for perfectionists with deadlines” motive to help developers build applications quickly.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/nodejs-vs-djangois-javascript-better-than-python?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Python Django Tutorial for Beginners

Python Django Tutorial – What is Django?
Django is a high-level Python framework. It is a free and open source framework, written in Python itself, and follows the model-view-template architectural pattern. We can use it to develop quality web applications faster and easier. Since developing for the web needs a set of similar components, you can use a framework. This way, you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. These tasks include authentication, forms, uploading files, management panels, and more.
nstall Django
To work with Django on your system, use the following command: 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/best-python-django-tutorial-for-beginners-with-pro?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

5 Programming Languages Every Programmer Should Learn

I read somewhere that programmers should learn a new programming language every year (I think it’s code complete, not sure, though), but if you cannot do so, I suggest you at least learn the following five programming languages to do well in your career.
Every company loves polyglot programmers and an well-rounded coder, who is versatile enough languages to write a quick script, and can also write complex Java programs, is a valuable coder indeed. In fact, it’s almost mandatory for a senior developer to learn more than one language.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/5-programming-languages-every-master-developer-sho?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Learning to Code With Interactive Training

My recent post on learning AI for free attracted a lot of interest because demand for learning materials is at an all-time high. In the technology industry, there’s huge demand for continuous education as we try to keep up with new subjects and cross-train to take on different roles. Most developers have an expectation and a desire to keep learning; it’s why we work in software, after all. These days, it’s easier than ever to learn new subjects, with a flood of online resources such as video courses, blogs, and forums to supplement books and online developer documentation. In AI and data science, particularly, there is such a demand for skilled developers that companies like Microsoft and Google are releasing their own training materials. Like many, I’ve taken a few online courses (MOOCs) from the range of different providers. However, just as for classroom learning, one size does not fit all. I find that sitting passively through videos and taking a basic multiple choice quiz at the end of them doesn’t help me learn. Despite the time spent in front of the video, I don’t remember much of the content so, when I need to get coding, it’s hard to get started. The way I learn is through doing — picking a project and cutting code. Many developers learn best from a hands-on approach, where they write code as they learn, break things, and ask questions along the way. This is why I recently wrote a second article about various AI communities to give you ideas for projects and support when you have questions.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/learning-to-code-with-interactive-training?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

One in a Million: Teaching Coding With Python

I’ve been teaching programming for more than 17 years. During this period, I’ve developed a nice inventory of exercises and code examples. Some of which are old as my teaching career, and even though I’ve taught, and continue to teach, a variety of languages, well, most examples are as good in any language.
Here is one of them — I use it in the first lesson on conditionals. This program generates a random number in the range of [0, 100] and then asks the user to guess it. The user gets one chance — it’s a very early lesson and the students don’t know loops yet. The program outputs “Correct” or “Wrong” and that’s it. Look at it (this time in Python, because that’s the language I teach now):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/one-in-a-million

Python Deployment Heck

Python coding is an awesome experience. Python deployment? Not so much. It’s not quite Hell, and things do get moving eventually rather than get stuck in Limbo, so let’s just call it “deployment heck.” Many of the pains associated with Python deployment are just growing pains: Python has suddenly become one of the most popular programming languages on the planet (primarily due to its data science and machine learning capabilities), and the cracks are beginning to show.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-deployment-heck?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

wxPython 101: Creating a Splash Screen

A common UI element that you used to see a lot of was the Splash Screen. A splash screen is just a dialog with a logo or art on it that sometimes includes a message about how far along the application has loaded. Some developers use splash screens as a way to tell the user that the application is loading so they don’t try to open it multiple times.
wxPython has support for creating splash screens. In versions of wxPython prior to version 4, you could find the splash screen widget in wx.SplashScreen. However, in wxPython’s latest version, it has been moved to wx.adv.SplashScreen.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/wxpython-101-creating-a-splash-screen

Python for OSGi Remote Services

The iPOPO project is a Python implementation of key parts of a standard OSGi framework…e.g. bundles, the service registry and servicereference API, and a dynamic service injection framework similar to the Apache iPOJO project…thus the name iPOPO.
With the 0.8.0 release of iPOPO, there is now a Python implementation of the OSGi Remote Services and Remote Service Admin (RSA) specifications. To distinguish from the previously-provided remote services in iPOPO, this is known as RSA Remote Services.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-for-osgi-remote-services?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Dependency Injection: Python

Overview
Dependency Injection (DI) is a software engineering technique for defining the dependencies among objects. Basically, the process of supplying a resource that a given piece of code requires. The required resource is called a dependency.
There are various classes and objects defined when writing code. Most of the time, these classes depend on other classes in order to fulfill their intended purpose. These classes, or a better word might be Components, know the resources they need and how to get them. DI handles defining these dependent resources and provides ways to instantiate or create them externally. Dependency Containers are used to implement this behavior and holds the map of dependencies for the components.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/dependency-injection-python-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev