PyDev of the Week: Qumisha Goss

This week we welcome Qumisha Goss (@QatalystGoss) as our PyDev of the Week. Q is a librarian from Detroit who gave one of the best keynotes I’ve ever seen at PyCon US this year. For some reason, the people who uploaded the Keynotes from that morning didn’t separate the keynotes from each other or from the morning’s lightning talks, so you have to seek about 2/3’s of the way through the official video to find Q’s keynote here: I personally think you should take a few moments and watch the video. But if you don’t have the time, you can still read this brief interview with this amazing person.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-qumisha-goss?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Fun With Python

“My favorite language for maintainability is Python. It has simple, clean syntax, object encapsulation, good library support, and optional named parameters.” – Bram Cohen

The company I’m working for started a project as a start-up last year. In the beginning, there was a discussion on what programming language to choose so that we could easily have an MVP (Minimum Valuable Product) in the shortest time possible, but also to learn something new while working on this project. The most common programming language used in the company is Java, thus we had to answer a question: do we want to continue with Java or try something else? We chose the second option. But what exactly does this “something else” mean?
First of all, the project is a web application, therefore we had to look first for a web framework and after that for a language that would be compatible with that framework. It didn’t take us too much time to find out the best option, so we opted for the Django web framework. As you might know, Django is a web framework written in Python, so the choice of the programming language was obvious – it’s Python. That’s how my journey with Python started.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/fun-with-python?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Naomi Ceder

This week we welcome Naomi Ceder (@NaomiCeder) as our PyDev of the Week. Naomi has been a long-time member of the Python community and is the author of The Quick Python Book. Naomi is the current chair of the board of directors for the Python Software Foundation and is a regular speaker at programming conferences. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Naomi better! Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc.)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-naomi-ceder

Java vs. Python: Coding Battle Royale

While we all started to learn how to code with HTML, developing a sophisticated app requires a more advanced language. Java and Python are two of the hottest programming languages in the market right now because of their versatility, efficiency, and automation capabilities. Both languages have their merits and their flaws, but the main difference is that Java is statically typed and Python is dynamically typed.
They have similarities, as they both adopt the “everything is an object” design, have great cross-platform support, and use immutable strings and deep standard libraries. However, they have plenty of differences that steer some coders towards Java and others towards Python. Java has always had a single large corporate sponsor, while Python is more distributed.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/java-vs-python-coding-battle-royale?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Maria Camila Remolina Gutierrez

This week we welcome Maria Camila Remolina Gutiérrez (@holamariacamila) as our PyDev of the Week! Maria recently gave a talk at PyCon USA in their new PyCon Charlas track last month. You can learn more about Maria on her website or you can check out her GitHub profile to see what she has been doing in the open source world. Let’s take a few minutes to get to know her better!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-maria-camila-remolina-gutieacute?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Moshe Zadka

This week we welcome Moshe Zadka (@moshezadka) as our PyDev of the Week! Moshe is a core developer of the Twisted project and he is also a co-author of Expert Twisted from Apress Publishing. He is also the author of a self-published book, From Python Import Better. You can find additional information about Moshe here where he includes links to his GitHub, Instagram, and blog.
Let’s take a few moments to hear what he was to say.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-moshe-zadka?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Kai Willadsen

This week we welcome Kai Willadsen (@kywe) as our PyDev of the Week! He is the maintainer of the Meld project, a cross-platform visual diff and merge tool written in Python. You can catch up with Kai on his blog or see what else he is working on via GitHub. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Kai better. Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-kai-willadsen?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Make Up Your Mind Between Node.js and Python

There is no such thing as the best programming language. There are languages that are used for more specific things than others. If you need a mobile application, web app, or a more specialized system, there may be a specific language. But let’s assume for the moment that what you need is a relatively simple website, where you can show your client’s products and maybe sell them online efficiently.
In this article, we have chosen to evaluate Node.js and Python to help you decide on the ideal programming solution.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-make-your-mind-between-nodejs-and-python-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Build a Scalable Twitter Clone With Django and Stream

In this tutorial, we will build a Twitter clone using Django and Stream, a hosted API for newsfeed development.
By the end, you’ll see how easy is to power your newsfeeds with Stream. For brevity, we leave out some basic Django-specific code and recommend referring to the GitHub project for the complete runnable source code. At the end of this tutorial, we’ll have a Django app (with a profile feed), a timeline feed, and support for following users, hashtags, and mentions.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/build-a-scalable-twitter-clone-with-django-and-str?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyCon 2018 Highlights

And yes, this is truncated because I left early, and missed some important things. I’m going to have to catch them on YouTube.

Stacy Morse – Code Reviews Using Art Critique Principles – PyCon 2018
Jake VanderPlas – Performance Python: Seven Strategies for Optimizing Your Numerical Code
Jiaqi Liu – Building a Data Pipeline with Testing in Mind – PyCon 2018
Brian Okken, Paul Everitt – Visual Testing with PyCharm and pytest – PyCon 2018
Carol Willing – Practical Sphinx – PyCon 2018
Dmitry Filippov, Ewa Jodlowska – By the Numbers: Python Community Trends in 2017/2018 – PyCon 2018
David Beazley – Reinventing the Parser Generator – PyCon 2018
Shannon Turner – You’re an expert. Here’s how to teach like one. – PyCon 2018
Matt Davis – Python Performance Investigation by Example – PyCon 2018
Barry Warsaw – Get your resources faster, with importlib.resources – PyCon 2018

Of course, you’ll also need to see the keynotes.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pycon-2018-highlights?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev