PyDev of the Week: Katherine Scott

This week we welcome Katherine Scott (@kscottz) as our PyDev of the Week! Katherine was the lead developer of the SimpleCV computer vision library and co-author of the SimpleCV O’Reilly Book. You can check out Katherine’s open-source projects over on GitHub. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!
Can You Tell Us a Little About Yourself (Hobbies, Education, Etc.):
A quick summary about me:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-katherine-scott?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

5 Python Scripts to Optimize Your Website SEO

Python is not only an amazing programming language, it’s also very helpful when it comes to developing tools for SEO. In this article, I have compiled 5 of the best Python scripts to optimize your website SEO: Check broken links and indexed URLs, grab data from Mozscape, and more.

Python SEO Analyzer
A small SEO tool that analyzes the structure of a site, crawls the site, counts words in the body of the site and warns of any general SEO related issues. The script requires Python 2.7+, BeautifulSoup4, minidom, nltk, numpy, and urllib2.Info and download: https://github.com/sethblack/python-seo-analyzer

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/5-python-scripts-to-optimize-your-website-seo?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Top 10 Programming Languages in 2017

Programming is something vast and rather individual as each developer chooses tools that are most convenient for them. However, certain languages, platforms, and frameworks have claimed themselves as some of the easiest and most efficient to use. Thus we have collected for you the top-10 programming languages loved by developers nowadays. Which one is your favorite?
Python
Python is a dynamic and general-purpose language that emphasizes code readability and enables developers to use fewer lines of code (in comparison with Java or C++). It supports multiple programming paradigms and has a large standard library.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/top-10-programming-languages-in-2017?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Brian E. Granger

This week we welcome Brian E. Granger (@ellisonbg) as our PyDev of the Week! Brian is an early core contributor of the IPython Notebook and now leads the Project Jupyter Notebook team. He is also an Associate Professor of Physics and Data Science at California Polytechnic State University. You can also check out what projects he is working on over at GitHub. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Brian better!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-brian-e-granger?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Build a Simple Android App with Java & Python for File Systems

Every week, new courses and workshops are published to the growing Treehouse Library! Here’s a short list of what we’ve added recently, upcoming course highlights, and our weekly video update of What’s New at Treehouse. NEW COURSES Build a Simple Android App…
The post New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Build a Simple Android App with Java & Python for File Systems appeared first on Treehouse Blog.

Link: http://blog.teamtreehouse.com/new-upcoming-course-highlights-simple-android-app-java-python-file-systems

PyDev of the Week: Dave Forgac

This week we welcome Dave Forgac as our PyDev of the Week! Dave is an organizer of PyOhio, ClePy, and the Cleveland API Meetup. He also gave a presentation about sharing your code at PyCon 2017 that you can watch below:
Dave also has a website that lists his other talks. You might also find his GitHub profile interesting. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Dave better!

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-dave-forgac?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Code Recipes Now on GitHub – 5,000+ Recipes for Python, Perl, Ruby and More

For more than a decade, ActiveState has hosted a vast repository of code recipes and discussions over at https://code.activestate.com/ – but in recent years it began to seem out-of-sync with the way developers shared code. New users and recipe updates had to be disabled to prevent spam and yet there remained a treasure-trove of interesting and useful pieces of code in this archive.
So, as the first phase of our ongoing effort to update and improve our community sites, we’ve migrated the entire library of code recipes (more than 5K recipes, 15K files and a mind-boggling >700K lines of code!) to GitHub. It’s become clear that GitHub is the central repository where developers share code, and to make it easier we’ve transferred all of the recipes, along with their descriptive text and original licensing terms to our new GitHub repo.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/code-recipes-now-on-github-5000-recipes-for-python?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Web Design, JavaScript, Bokeh, & Jupyter Notebooks

Every week, new courses and workshops are published to the growing Treehouse Library! Here’s a short list of what we’ve added recently, upcoming course highlights, and our weekly video update of What’s New at Treehouse. NEW COURSES Web Design Process– Nick Pettit (43 minutes)…
The post New & Upcoming Course Highlights: Web Design, JavaScript, Bokeh, & Jupyter Notebooks appeared first on Treehouse Blog.

Link: http://blog.teamtreehouse.com/new-upcoming-course-highlights-web-design-javascript-bokeh-jupyter

Python: All About Decorators

Decorators can be a bit mind-bending when first encountered and they can also be a bit tricky to debug. But they are a neat way to add functionality to functions and classes. Decorators are also known as a “higher-order function.” What this means is that they can take one or more functions as arguments and return a function as its result. In other words, decorators will take the function they are decorating and extend its behavior while not actually modifying what the function itself does.
There have been two decorators in Python since version 2.2, namely classmethod() and staticmethod(). Then PEP 318 was put together and the decorator syntax was added to make decorating functions and methods possible in Python 2.4. Class decorators were proposed in PEP 3129 to be included in Python 2.6. They appear to work in Python 2.7, but the PEP indicates that they weren’t accepted until Python 3, so I’m not sure what happened there.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-all-about-decorators?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev