Python Deployment Heck

Python coding is an awesome experience. Python deployment? Not so much. It’s not quite Hell, and things do get moving eventually rather than get stuck in Limbo, so let’s just call it “deployment heck.” Many of the pains associated with Python deployment are just growing pains: Python has suddenly become one of the most popular programming languages on the planet (primarily due to its data science and machine learning capabilities), and the cracks are beginning to show.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-deployment-heck?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

wxPython 101: Creating a Splash Screen

A common UI element that you used to see a lot of was the Splash Screen. A splash screen is just a dialog with a logo or art on it that sometimes includes a message about how far along the application has loaded. Some developers use splash screens as a way to tell the user that the application is loading so they don’t try to open it multiple times.
wxPython has support for creating splash screens. In versions of wxPython prior to version 4, you could find the splash screen widget in wx.SplashScreen. However, in wxPython’s latest version, it has been moved to wx.adv.SplashScreen.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/wxpython-101-creating-a-splash-screen

Python for OSGi Remote Services

The iPOPO project is a Python implementation of key parts of a standard OSGi framework…e.g. bundles, the service registry and servicereference API, and a dynamic service injection framework similar to the Apache iPOJO project…thus the name iPOPO.
With the 0.8.0 release of iPOPO, there is now a Python implementation of the OSGi Remote Services and Remote Service Admin (RSA) specifications. To distinguish from the previously-provided remote services in iPOPO, this is known as RSA Remote Services.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/python-for-osgi-remote-services?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Dependency Injection: Python

Overview
Dependency Injection (DI) is a software engineering technique for defining the dependencies among objects. Basically, the process of supplying a resource that a given piece of code requires. The required resource is called a dependency.
There are various classes and objects defined when writing code. Most of the time, these classes depend on other classes in order to fulfill their intended purpose. These classes, or a better word might be Components, know the resources they need and how to get them. DI handles defining these dependent resources and provides ways to instantiate or create them externally. Dependency Containers are used to implement this behavior and holds the map of dependencies for the components.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/dependency-injection-python-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How I Use Python to Blog From My iPhone

Over the last 12 years, I have been blogging almost uninterruptedly about different subjects (mostly on tech stuff), on different platforms and using a variety of devices and applications. First on desktop and laptop computers, and more recently from iPhone and iPad. This year I went on to try something new and decided to create this blog based on Pelican, a static site generator made with Python. And I got the whole process working on my iPhone, which has become, arguably, my main personal computer. So, how do I publish new content to this blog from my iPhone?
1. I Write Each Article in Markdown
Markdown is a simple syntax that can be easily translated to HTML (and a bunch of other formats), but only requires a simple text editor and allows us to focus on the content. On my Mac, I tend to use either Ulysses, or BBEdit, or VIM, whatever comes to hand. On iPhone, currently, I use Ulysses, Drafts or Working Copy. I may start with Drafts or Ulysses, then copy to Working Copy and go on from there…

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-i-use-python-to-blog-from-my-iphone-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Ricky White

This week we welcome Ricky White (@EndlessTrax) as our PyDev of the Week. Ricky is the owner of White Lion Media. He is also the Community Manager at Real Python. If you go to his website, you will find that he has written some non-technical books, which is pretty neat. You can also check out his GitHub profile to see what projects he is working on. Let’s take a few minutes to get to know Ricky!
Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc.)?:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-ricky-white?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Web Dev Roundup: Snakes on an App

Hello there and thanks for tuning in for this month’s roundup! Last time, we discussed CRUD applications and what the DZone community is building with this approach to developing apps. In this month’s post, we’re taking a look at using Python as a web development language. We examine the benefits of using Python as the main language in your web application, some processes to follow to simple, Python-based apps, and a few resources to check out to learn more about this powerful language. 
And, as a quick side note, if you’re interested in writing for DZone, but don’t have a topic in mind, come check out our Bounty Board, where you can win prizes for providing great content, and our Writer’s Zone which has plenty of prompts, tips, and tricks! 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/web-dev-roundup-snakes-on-an-app?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

PyDev of the Week: Qumisha Goss

This week we welcome Qumisha Goss (@QatalystGoss) as our PyDev of the Week. Q is a librarian from Detroit who gave one of the best keynotes I’ve ever seen at PyCon US this year. For some reason, the people who uploaded the Keynotes from that morning didn’t separate the keynotes from each other or from the morning’s lightning talks, so you have to seek about 2/3’s of the way through the official video to find Q’s keynote here: I personally think you should take a few moments and watch the video. But if you don’t have the time, you can still read this brief interview with this amazing person.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/pydev-of-the-week-qumisha-goss?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev