State Management in React Apps – Part I

In previous articles, we have learned how to properly use JSX, and how React components communicate with each other. Yet, we still didn’t cover another very important question: where to store information that our application cares about. Today we’re talking about application state management in React.
There are a lot of ways to handle application state, but, first, let’s take a look at the simplest one – component state.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/state-management-in-react-apps-part-i?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Use Ref Callbacks to Measure React Component Size

You can use ref callbacks to measure the rendered size of React components, did you know? It’s a neat little trick.
Here’s how it works:1. React renders your component.2. Browser layout engine does its thing.3. ref callback fires.4. Use getBoundingClientRect to measure element size.5. Use this info for whatever you want.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/use-ref-callbacks-to-measure-react-component-size?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

React Component Lifecycle

All React components go through a lifecycle which enables you to perform a specific task at any specific time. In order to achieve that, you can override the lifecycle methods. Methods prefixed with will are called right before something occurs (events), and methods prefixed with did are called right after something occurs.
Let us understand all the functions in all the phases of the lifecycle:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/react-component-lifecycle

Declarative D3 Charts With React 16.3 [Text and Video]

The new React 16.3 brings some changes to the ecosystem that change how we go about integrating React and D3 to build data visualizations. I previously wrote about this in Declarative D3 transitions with React 16.3
componentWillReceiveProps, componentWillUpdate, and componentWillMount are on their way out. They were great for making React and D3 happy together, but they cause issues with async rendering that the React team is planning for React 17.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/declarative-d3-charts-with-react-163-text-and-vide?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

ASP.NET Core: CRUD With React.js and Entity Framework Core

In this article, we are going to create a web application using ASP.NET Core 2.0 and React.js with the help of the Entity Framework Core database first approach. We will be creating a sample Employee Record Management system and performing CRUD operations on it. To read the inputs from the user, we are using HTML Form elements with required field validations on the client side. We are also going to bind a dropdown list in the HTML Form to a table in the database using EF Core.
We will be using Visual Studio 2017 and SQL Server 2014.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/aspnet-core-crud-with-reactjs-and-entity-framework?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

The ASP.NET Core React Project

In the last post I wrote, I had a first look at a plain, clean, and lightweight React setup. I’m still impressed how easy the setup is and how fast the loading of a React app really is. Before trying to push this setup into an ASP.NET Core application, it would make sense to have a look at the ASP.NET Core React project.
Create the React Project
You can either use the “File New Project …" dialog in Visual Studio 2017 or the .NET CLI to create a new ASP.NET Core React project:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-aspnet-core-react-project?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Trying React the First Time

The last two years, I have worked a lot with Angular. I learned a lot and I also wrote some blog posts about it. While I worked with Angular, I always had React in mind and wanted to learn about that. But I never head the time or a real reason to look at it. I still have no reason to try it, but a little bit of time. So why not?  This post is just a small overview of what I learned during the setup and in the very first attempts at using React.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/trying-react-the-first-time?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Declarative D3 Transitions With React 16.3 [Video]

The new React 16.3 brings some changes to the ecosystem that change how we go about integrating React and D3 to build data visualizations.
componentWillReceiveProps, componentWillUpdate and compnentWillMount are on their way out. They were great for making React and D3 happy together, but they cause issues with the async rendering that the React team is planning for React 17.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/declarative-d3-transitions-with-react-163-video?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev