JavaScript Frameworks: How To Make Your Choice

JavaScript is one of the most commonly used, basic languages of the Internet. According to a survey, JavaScript was the top language among front-end developers, and it doesn’t seem to be losing popularity. That’s why, today, there are so many JavaScript frameworks — and it’s difficult to understand which is most effective. The more frameworks that appear, the more discussions that surround them. The developer community talks a lot about which frameworks are most efficient for front-end development. Based on our research, we’ve identified the five most-discussed JavaScript frameworks. We also share Yalantis’ experience by showing the JavaScript frameworks what our front-end developers prefer.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/javascript-frameworks-how-to-make-your-choice?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

React’s New Component Lifecycle

Not long ago Ankit Kumar wrote an excellent article about React’s component lifecycle. One of the things about technology is that IT changes, and changes quickly. React’s current stable version is 16.4.1, and with it came some significant changes planned and implemented for the lifecycle hooks.
I am somewhat new to React and have been building a project in which I decided to use the new lifecycle hooks. This article discusses the new changes, and my experience switching from the old lifecycle hooks to the new lifecycle hooks as well as a pitfall that I hope to help you avoid.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/reacts-new-component-lifecycle?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

3 Common Redux Bugs (and How to Fix Them)

Web developers hate bugs because they lead to malfunctioning applications. Bugs make an application to behave in undesirable ways, something which affects the experience of users.
Redux developers hate bugs, too. Because the JavaScript library is mainly used to manage state in applications, any occurrence of bugs often leads to inconsistencies and unnecessary breakages.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/3-common-redux-bugs-and-how-to-fix-them?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

State Management in React Apps – Part I

In previous articles, we have learned how to properly use JSX, and how React components communicate with each other. Yet, we still didn’t cover another very important question: where to store information that our application cares about. Today we’re talking about application state management in React.
There are a lot of ways to handle application state, but, first, let’s take a look at the simplest one – component state.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/state-management-in-react-apps-part-i?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Use Ref Callbacks to Measure React Component Size

You can use ref callbacks to measure the rendered size of React components, did you know? It’s a neat little trick.
Here’s how it works:1. React renders your component.2. Browser layout engine does its thing.3. ref callback fires.4. Use getBoundingClientRect to measure element size.5. Use this info for whatever you want.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/use-ref-callbacks-to-measure-react-component-size?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

React Component Lifecycle

All React components go through a lifecycle which enables you to perform a specific task at any specific time. In order to achieve that, you can override the lifecycle methods. Methods prefixed with will are called right before something occurs (events), and methods prefixed with did are called right after something occurs.
Let us understand all the functions in all the phases of the lifecycle:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/react-component-lifecycle

Declarative D3 Charts With React 16.3 [Text and Video]

The new React 16.3 brings some changes to the ecosystem that change how we go about integrating React and D3 to build data visualizations. I previously wrote about this in Declarative D3 transitions with React 16.3
componentWillReceiveProps, componentWillUpdate, and componentWillMount are on their way out. They were great for making React and D3 happy together, but they cause issues with async rendering that the React team is planning for React 17.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/declarative-d3-charts-with-react-163-text-and-vide?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev