Demystifying Redux

Redux is a library that helps you manage the status of your app. In this article, ‘Demystifying Redux,’  we will not discuss why to use it and how to use it correctly; we will only focus on how to create our own implementation by approaching the final result without having to cover all its aspects, details, and tools. The goal is to understand how it works in broad strokes to eliminate most of the mystery behind this simple library. Our demystifying redux example is based on a list of Korfbal players which we will be able to add as summoned in the match next week. It is the typical example but with a personal touch;)

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/demystifying-redux

How to Use Redux in Your React.js App in Just 10 Minutes

If you have decided to use Redux as your state management library, now you actually have done the hard part. Deciding which library to use. Everything else is very easy and fast. Follow along to create a to-do app with Redux in just 5 minutes.
The Idea Behind Redux
You have mainly three components: store, reducer, and actions.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-use-redux-in-your-reactjs-app-in-just-10-mi?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Old Flux, New Flux

If you are not new to front-end development, you have heard about the evolution in Flux, Redux, and React, and, most likely, have tried it or directly used it in a project. It comes with no surprise since the popularity of React is undeniable. React’s success is attributable to its simplicity, ease of use, and a great community. Evolution of Flux I would also bet that most of you have used React with Redux. Both libraries go hand-in-hand so often that it’s difficult to imagine it’s possible to use React without Redux. Nevertheless, believe it or not, React is a library for building user interfaces developed by Facebook, and Redux is a library for managing application’s state developed by Dan Abramov and Andrew Clark, not Facebook. Facebook has its own library to do that job, which is Flux. Despite Flux being released about a year before Redux, and coming from Facebook itself, Redux has become the de facto standard to use with React. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/old-flux-new-flux?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Namespacing Redux Action Type Constant Values

Most everyone agrees that defining constants for your Redux action types is a good idea. If you use string literals, it’s all too easy to misspell one and wonder why your reducer isn’t responding. If you use a constant, your IDE can point out that gaffe right away.
Here’s an example from the Redux documentation:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/namespacing-redux-action-type-constant-values?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

What Is Better for Web Development, React or Angular?

It is considered in IT world that customers can completely rely on their technology partners to get their products successfully delivered but probably they have never tried to conduct their own research on the stacks, technologies, or tools required for their projects. In this article, you will learn what is the difference between React and Angular and how to make your own choice.
Angular Pros and Cons
542 Angular jobs are currently offered on Indeed in the United States. Surely, the prime advantage of Angular is its popularity. It could be argued that it is Google that affected the way7 Angular is treated. However, the first version of Angular has quickly become popular because those developers who came from other development environments found there a familiar MVC pattern for building single-page applications (SPAs). After upgrading AngularJS and modifying some of its features, the popularity of the framework skyrocketed. And there is no wonder that today the IT market has a serious demand for Angular developers. Moreover, it is one of the few frameworks which provides a set of rich possibilities and components for creating user interfaces.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/what-is-better-for-web-development-react-or-angula?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Building a React-Based Chat Client With Redux, Part 2: React With Redux and Bindings

Welcome back! If you missed Part 1 on React and ReactDOM, you can check it out here.
The Full Monty: React With Redux and Bindings
Adding Redux introduces additional complexity, and greatly increases the number of files and folders in the project. It also requires some additional dependencies and a change in process for building and serving the client.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/building-a-react-based-chat-client-with-redux-part

Building a React-Based Chat Client With Redux, Part 1: React and ReactDOM

Let’s build a non-trivial app with React and then refactor it to use Redux!

Much of the advice you get regarding the addition of Redux to your React projects is to only do so once they reach a certain size, because of the extra complexity Redux adds. That’s certainly fair. But it will leave you with a bit of technical debt (refactoring to be done later) that you wouldn’t have if you just started out with React and Redux.
Consequently, I thought it might be nice to present an exercise where we do just that: build an app as simply as possible using React and ReactDOM alone (not even JSX since you need more dependencies and a build process to support that), and then refactor to use JSX and Redux.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/building-a-react-based-chat-client-with-redux?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

3 Common Redux Bugs (and How to Fix Them)

Web developers hate bugs because they lead to malfunctioning applications. Bugs make an application to behave in undesirable ways, something which affects the experience of users.
Redux developers hate bugs, too. Because the JavaScript library is mainly used to manage state in applications, any occurrence of bugs often leads to inconsistencies and unnecessary breakages.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/3-common-redux-bugs-and-how-to-fix-them?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Components Are the New Thin Client

Here is a presentation about state management that I did with Bonnie Brennan at AngularConnect last year. It has been amazing to see the progression of state management tools over the last few years as they have significantly reduced development time and complexity within our applications and brought the focus back to what matters: building things that people love. Enjoy!

Link: http://onehungrymind.com/47170-2/