How to Install Backdrop CMS on FAMP (FreeBSD 11.2)

Backdrop is an open source and free content management system (CMS). It is a fork of Drupal, mobile-friendly, and fast. You don’t need to know any programming languages to use Backdrop CMS. You can easily create, edit, and manage your content.
Backdrop CMS provides you with a multi-level user experience. This means that you can set different levels of permissions for different people. Backdrop CMS has add-ons, plugins, themes, and layouts. You can use them directly; you don’t need to search for other add-ons or themes. Even if you need to modify its API, you can do this according to your needs.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-install-backdrop-cms-on-famp-freebsd-112?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

The Complete Guide to Object-Oriented Programming With PHP (Part 1)

Introduction
Learning object-oriented-programming is one if not the most valuable skills a web developer can learn.
For instance, there are places, like London, that are so competitive that you must have OOP among your abilities in order to get a job as a PHP Developer.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-complete-guide-to-object-oriented-programming?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Single Page Application Using Server-Side Blazor

Introduction
In this article, we will create a Single Page Application (SPA) using the server-side Blazor concepts with the help of Entity Framework Core database first approach. Single-Page Applications are web applications that load a single HTML page and dynamically update that page as the user interacts with the app.
We will be creating a sample Employee Record Management System and perform CRUD operations on it. A modal popup will display the form to handle inputs and the form also will have a dropdown list, which will bind to a database table. We will also provide a filter option to the user to filter the employee records based on employee name.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/single-page-application-using-server-side-blazor?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Understanding Server-Side Blazor

Introduction
We all know that the Blazor framework is a client-side web framework. But is it possible to run a Blazor application separate from the UI thread? The latest version of Blazor (0.5.0) gives us the flexibility to run Blazor in a separate process from the rendering process. We are going to explore server-side Blazor in this article.
What Is Server-Side Blazor?
Since Blazor is a client-side web framework, the component logic and DOM interaction both happen in the same process.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/understanding-server-side-blazor-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Build a Simple Dialog for Your NativeScript Apps

There are a few different ways to implement dialogs in NativeScript apps. The NativeScript dialog module lets you show a variety of dialogs using built-in APIs, and is great for simple use cases.
A sample of the NativeScript dialog module. Try this example in NativeScript Playground

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-build-a-simple-dialog-for-your-nativescript?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Deploying a Blazor Application on Azure

Introduction In this article, we will learn how to deploy an ASP.NET Core hosted Blazor application on Azure. We will use Visual Studio 2017 to publish the app and create a SQL database server on Azure to handle DB operations. Prerequisites Install the .NET Core 2.1 or above SDK from here. Install Visual Studio 2017 v15.7 or above from here. Install ASP.NET Core Blazor Language Services extension from here. An Azure subscription account. You can create a free Azure account here. Please refer to my previous article Cascading DropDownList in Blazor Using EF Core to create the application that we will be deploying in this tutorial.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/deploying-a-blazor-application-on-azure

Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 07: OutputFormatter

In this seventh post, I want to write about, how to send your Data in different formats and types to the client. By default the ASP.NET Core Web API sends the data as JSON, but there are some more ways to send the data.
The Series Topics

Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 1: Logging
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 2: Configuration
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 3: Dependency Injection
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 4: HTTPS
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 5: HostedServices
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 6: Middleswares
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 7: OutputFormatter – This article
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 8: ModelBinder
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 9: ActionFilter
Customizing ASP.NET Core Part 10: TagHelpers

About OutputFormatters
OutputFormatters are classes that turn your data into a different format to send them through HTTP to the clients. Web API uses a default OutputFormatter to turn objects into JSON, which is the default format to send data in a structured way. Other built-in formatters are an XML formatter and a plain text formatter.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/customizing-aspnet-core-part-07-outputformatter

How to Preview Blobs With HTTP POST and Angular 5

With Angular, we can call a web service to get an image as a Blob, convert that to an image and display it on a web page. This may sound like a straight and standard use case but I ended up spending a lot of time trying to get this to work and a lot of asking around. This has been one of the main motivations to write this article.
What I Wanted to Do

To begin with, I am building a website that displays thumbnails retrieved from a URL. On clicking on the thumbnail, the full sized image loads in a new page. Like a typical carousel, but the catch is that the thumbnail is generated dynamically and does not load from or stored on the local machine.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-preview-blobs-with-http-post-and-angular-5?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Perl6::Math::Matrix (Part 4: Naming Methods)

While reflecting on how to write a good Perl 6 module, I thought a lot about how to properly name my methods. In this text, I want to summarize what served me wel, which is a direct continuation of the last part, where I wrote about when it is helpful that methods share one name. Do (Not) Dare (to) Differ In software engineering there exists a discipline called DDD, or Domain Driven Design, which is just an academic term for: “just use the language people of a certain field are used to." That just makes sense for effective communication, but why? (If psychology bores you, just skip the next two paragraphs).

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/perl6mathmatrix-part-4-naming-methods?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How Upload Files With Node.js

Front-end development throws a lot of shade over backend processes these days, especially in the land of JavaScript. Originally a language targeting browsers, JS has matured into every nook and cranny of modern development as a de facto tool. The syntax for interacting with various libraries in JavaScript can be confusingly identical between front-end and backend environments, so it helps to have a clear picture of what is going on. We’ll discuss the context briefly below, and then I’ll end with my own recipe for you to upload files with node.
The Problem: Information Overload
Searching for “JavaScript File Uploads" will yield an abundance of results, but it can be hard to tell at first glance which practical examples are targeting your specific needs. SDKs often don’t care that much they’re run, so it is up to the developer to clearly understand the nuances involved.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/upload-files-with-node?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev