Error Handling and std::optional

In my last two posts in the C++17 STL series, I covered how to use std::optional. This wrapper type (also called “vocabulary type") is handy when you’d like to express that something is ‘nullable’ and might be ’empty.’ For example, you can return std::nullopt to indicate that the code generated an error… but it this the best choice?
What’s the Problem?
Let’s see an example:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/error-handling-and-stdoptional?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Using Refs in Stencil

Why Use Refs?
The first question that you might ask yourself is why bother using element references? Let’s clarify that.
In a typical data flow, you will pass props from the parent to it’s child elements. When passing props, the child component will re-render and you will get it’s new state. There are times that you will need to imperatively modify a child outside of this typical flow. Here are examples of things that might need different flow:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/using-refs-in-stencil?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Create and Publish Web Components With Vue CLI 3

Are web components “the future" for the web platform? There are many opinions both for and against. What is a fact, though, is that browser support is emerging for web components and there are a growing number of tools and resources for authors interested in creating and publishing web components of their own.
A great tool for creating web components is Vue.js, and it’s been made even easier with the release of Vue CLI 3 and the new @vue/web-component-wrapper library.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/create-amp-publish-web-components-with-vue-cli-3?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

In-Place Construction for std::any, std::variant, and std::optional

When you read articles or reference pages for std::any, std::optional, or std::variant you might notice a few helper types called in_place_* available in constructors.
Why do we need such syntax? Is this more efficient than the “standard" construction?

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/in-place-construction-for-stdany-stdvariant-and-st?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Single Page Application Using Server-Side Blazor

Introduction
In this article, we will create a Single Page Application (SPA) using the server-side Blazor concepts with the help of Entity Framework Core database first approach. Single-Page Applications are web applications that load a single HTML page and dynamically update that page as the user interacts with the app.
We will be creating a sample Employee Record Management System and perform CRUD operations on it. A modal popup will display the form to handle the use inputs and also give the form a dropdown list, which will bind to a database table. We will also provide a filter option to the user to filter the employee records based on employee name.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/single-page-application-using-server-side-blazor-a?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Style Images With Markdown

Markdown is a convenient HTML-focused shorthand syntax for formatting content such as documentation and blog articles, but it lacks basic features for image formatting, such as alignment and sizing. This post presents a variety of ways to format images with Markdown, from brute force to proprietary syntax extensions, unwise hacks, and everything in between.
Here’s how you insert an image in Markdown:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-style-images-with-markdown?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev