Top 21 JavaScript and CSS Libraries for UI/UX

1. Algolia
If you want to add forms on your website with autocomplete features, this is the library that you should use. It is accurate and fast. We specifically loved the map feature which allows you to add a map in the address field for searching locations.
2. Wired Elements
Let’s suppose someone asked you to create a page where the elements seem to be hand drawn. To be clear, there should not be any pattern between 2 elements. Wired Elements is the solution to that. This JavaScript \ library enables you to design UI elements and make them look like they have been drawn by hand.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/top-21-javascript-and-css-libraries-to-develop-you

10 jQuery Techniques for Better User Experience

JavaScript is one of the most used web technologies out there. And, why not? It offers so many features that let a web designer improve the user experience.
jQuery is one of those JavaScript libraries that is heavily used by web designers and front-end developers to bring designs to life. It integrates well with web applications, offers excellent animation features, and, most importantly, lets you control individual elements on a web page.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/10-new-jquery-techniques-for-better-user-experienc?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Insights on the Current and Future State of Web and Mobile Development

This article is featured in the new DZone Guide to Dynamic Web and Mobile Development. Get your free copy for more insightful articles, industry statistics, and more! To gather insights on the current and future state of web and mobile development we talked to 19 IT executives. Here’s who we spoke to:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/insights-on-the-current-and-future-state-of-web-an?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Does a Hamburger Menu Belong in a WinForms App?

User interfaces are constantly evolving in a bid to make every user of an application a power user. We build applications with lots of great features and capabilities and we want these to be readily available and easily accessible to the end user. Is it Familiar or Intuitive? When I use a piece of software there are usually three different kinds of UIs I encounter. First are the interactions I am already familiar with from other apps, such as a menu at the top, or a ribbon bar, or a multiple document interface. Second come the new things that are very intuitive as to how they are supposed to be used. This is what we usually refer to as awesome UI/UX — it’s something I’m not familiar with but at the same time something that I seem to know how to use. Once such thing for me was radial menus. Although they have not gained much traction, I immediately felt comfortable using one right from the word go. The third kind are things hidden somewhere in the application that are sometimes impossible to find without external help, e.g. a functionality that has a shortcut but no other way of accessing it.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/does-a-hamburger-menu-belong-in-a-winforms-app?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev