Top 10 PHP Errors From 1,000+ Projects (and How to Avoid Them)

Recently, we looked at our database of thousands of projects and found the top 10 errors in PHP apps. We’re going to show you what causes them and how to prevent them. Avoiding these “gotchas" will make you a better developer.
Because data is king, we collected, analyzed, and ranked the top 10 PHP errors. Rollbar collects all the errors for each project and summarizes how many times each one occurred. We do this by grouping errors according to their fingerprints. We group two errors if the second one is just a repeat of the first. This gives users an excellent overview instead of an overwhelming big dump like you’d see in a log file.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/top-10-php-errors-from-1000-projects-and-how-to-av?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Old Flux, New Flux

If you are not new to front-end development, you have heard about the evolution in Flux, Redux, and React, and, most likely, have tried it or directly used it in a project. It comes with no surprise since the popularity of React is undeniable. React’s success is attributable to its simplicity, ease of use, and a great community. Evolution of Flux I would also bet that most of you have used React with Redux. Both libraries go hand-in-hand so often that it’s difficult to imagine it’s possible to use React without Redux. Nevertheless, believe it or not, React is a library for building user interfaces developed by Facebook, and Redux is a library for managing application’s state developed by Dan Abramov and Andrew Clark, not Facebook. Facebook has its own library to do that job, which is Flux. Despite Flux being released about a year before Redux, and coming from Facebook itself, Redux has become the de facto standard to use with React. 

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/old-flux-new-flux?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

The Excitement Surrounding the Angular 6 Updates

With all of the recent exciting changes in Angular v6’s release and the large shift in both the enterprise and SMB market towards adopting Angular as the go-to framework for building business applications, Infragistics is making sure to stay on the cutting edge of web development. Speaking to the ripple effect Angular has had in modern web development, our Angular team has been vocal about their plans to give web developers accessibility and ease when working with Angular on their upcoming projects. By providing tools for the upcoming wave of developers moving to building line of business applications in Angular, we’re making sure that we deliver best of breed UI components and the fastest Angular data grid with our products, Ignite UI for Angular and Ignite UI CLI.
Recently, we’ve been working on adding another product to our Angular productivity line, Indigo Design to Code Studio. Announced at Google I/O, Indigo D2C Studio is a digital product design platform that brings developers and designers together to build amazing user experiences. For example, once the iterative design process is complete, developers can use the Indigo D2C Studio Visual Studio Code plug-in and UI components to create a pixel-perfect Angular or Flutter application for Android and iOS. The product is highlighting Infragistics’ goal in working closely with Google’s Angular team to develop forward-thinking tools for web, desktop, and mobile applications, so be sure to read the latest press release and sign up for the upcoming preview.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-excitement-surrounding-the-angular-6-updates?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How to Add Ignite UI to an Existing Angular Project

Let’s say that you’re already working on an existing Angular project, and you wish to add the Ignite UI for Angular library into the project. In this blog post, we will follow a step-by-step approach to add Ignite UI Angular library into an existing Angular project.
Step 1: Add Ignite UI for Angular library
Begin by adding the Ignite UI Angular library in the project. We can use npm to do this. So, run the command shown below to install Ignite UI for Angular.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-to-add-ignite-ui-to-an-existing-angular-projec?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Vue Example: Creating a TODO App using Vue.js 2, Vuex, and Codemix [Video]

Looking for an efficient way to create web apps? Look no further – CodeMix is here to give you an entirely new experience. The following video shows you how to create a Vue example app, created in Eclipse and powered up by CodeMix. CodeMix is an Eclipse plugin that unlocks a wide array of technologies from VS Code and add-on extensions built for Code OSS. The Vue extension pack included with CodeMix includes everything you need for a superior coding experience as you follow along with the Vue example app in the video.
To create this application, you will be working with .vue, .js, and .html files. As you progress through your setup, you will create several components for the app using CodeMix’s powerful Vue.js support. Here’s a little taste of what you get when you use CodeMix:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/vue-example-creating-a-todo-app-using-vuejs-2-vuex?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Functional Programming Unit Testing in Node (Part 3)

Welcome to Part 3 where we’ll show you how to navigate class based code using FP, go over composing all these asynchronous functions we wrote, and continuing to define our dependencies in curried functions to make them easier to test.
Contents
This is a six-part series on refactoring imperative code in Node to a functional programming style with unit tests. You are currently on Part 3.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/functional-programming-unit-testing-in-node-part-3?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Building a Simple Progress Bar for Your NativeScript App

Progress bars are a common user interface component that usually look something like this.
In this article, we’ll look at how you can easily recreate progres bars like this for your NativeScript apps, and learn a bit about NativeScript’s layout system in the process.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/building-a-simple-progress-bar-for-your-nativescri?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev