Running an ASP.NET Core Application as a Windows Service

ASP.NET Core 2.1 introduces a new application host for Windows services. We can now run ASP.NET Core applications as Windows services with minimal effort. This blog post introduces how it is done and how to build and run Windows services on ASP.NET Core without any need for dirty hacks.
Creating a Default Web Application
We start with new default ASP.NET Core 2.1 web application.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/running-aspnet-core-application-as-windows-service?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Angular Elements With CodeMix

Angular has been one of the best front-end JavaScript frameworks for some time now, and one of the many reasons is their continued effort to bring to new and improved ways to get the job done. One such effort is Angular Elements, which was introduced in Angular v6. In a nutshell, they convert components to HTML elements (+ JavaScript), allowing you to use your components in other apps, different frameworks (like React), or even in a simple HTML + JavaScript setup!

This is implemented using the new Custom Elements API supported by most modern browsers, and the process of converting a component to a custom element ensures all required Angular infrastructure (data binding, change detection, etc.) is available to the browser.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/angular-elements-made-simple-with-codemix?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

How HTTP Chunked Encoding Was Killing a Request

Recently, someone asked me to look at their ASP.NET MVC application and help figure out why a certain request was taking 16 seconds to complete. It’s always fun to look at those things, so I could not pass on this nerd snipe.
Getting Started: Observe
Much like with hunting serial killers, you have to become one with the scene at hand. Look at a few things that happen, and observe.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/how-http-chunked-encoding-was-killing-a-request?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Vue.js Series: Lifecycle Hooks

Lifecycle hooks are the defined methods which get executed in a certain stage of the Vue object lifespan. Starting from the initialization, to when it gets destroyed, the object follows different phases of life. Here is a famous diagram indicating the hook sequence.
(Image source: https://vuejs.org/v2/guide/instance.html#Lifecycle-Diagram)

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/vuejs-series-lifecycle-hooks?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

The Big Bang of Web Development: Let’s Talk About Accessibility

I want to take a break from the code focused session to talk about an important topic – accessibility. I was only recently enlightened as to how important this is at a conference I attended in April. Before we get too deep into this, if you want to review the coding stuff (as I will mention it occasionally in this post), review these posts:
1: Starting at index.html

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/the-big-bang-of-web-development-lets-talk-about-ac?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Material Dashboard Using Angular 6

Introduction
Recently, Angular released its latest version, Angular 6.0. In the latest version, they have focused more on the toolchain, which provides us with a way to quick start our tasks easier, as well as some synchronized versions, such as Angular/core, Angular/compiler, etc.
With the release of Angular 6.0, one of the features which I like the most is Material Dashboard, which is kind of a starter component with a list of dynamic card components.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/material-dashboard-using-angular-6?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Creating a Signature Pad Using Canvas and ASP.NET Core Razor Pages

In one of our projects, we needed to add the possibility to add signatures to PDF documents. A technician fills out a checklist online and a responsible person and the technician need to sign the checklist afterward. The signatures then get embedded into a generated PDF document together with the results of the checklist. The signatures must be created on a web UI, running on an iPad Pro.
It was pretty clear that we needed to use the HTML5 canvas element and to capture the pointer movements. Fortunately, we stumbled upon a pretty cool library on GitHub, created by Szymon Nowak from Poland. It is the super awesome Signature Pad written in TypeScript and available as an NPM and Yarn package. It is also possible to use a CDN to use the Signature Pad.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/creating-a-signature-pad-using-canvas-and-aspnet-c?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev