Comparison of JavaScript Pivot Grids for Developers

In this article, I’d like to consider the most popular JavaScript pivot grid components. During this review, I won’t dive into the coding since each grid has exhaustive and well-written documentation (at least, I hope so). Instead, I’ll focus on the core features of each pivot grid. Since I believe that there are some beginner developers among the readers, I’ll pay particular attention to documentation and demo pages. It’s a pretty convenient way to learn something while having a working example before your eyes. Therefore, demo pages with code examples and detailed descriptions will be a plus.
The principle of pivots selection is simple. I’ll check the most popular of those that can be used as stand-alone components. The reason is that I’m looking for relatively cheap and lightweight options leaving complex solutions for the future articles. So, let’s take a look at the list of JavaScript pivot grids I’m going to review today:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/comparison-of-javascript-pivot-grids-for-developer?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Creating a Chat Application Using React and ASP.NET Core – Part 2

In this blog series, I’m going to create a small chat application using React and ASP.NET Core, to learn more about React and to learn how React behaves in an ASP.NET Core project during development and deployment. This Series is divided into 5 parts, which should cover all relevant topics:

React Chat Part 1: Requirements & Setup
React Chat Part 2: Creating the UI & React Components
React Chat Part 3: Adding Websockets using SignalR
React Chat Part 4: Authentication & Storage
React Chat Part 5: Deployment to Azure

I also set-up a GitHub repository where you can follow the project. Feel free to share your ideas about that topic in the comments below or in issues on GitHub. Because I’m still learning React, please tell me about significant and conceptual errors by dropping a comment or by creating an Issue on GitHub. Thanks.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/creating-a-chat-application-using-react-and-aspnet-1?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

A Detailed Study of Flux: The React.js Application Architecture

Flux is a new kind of architecture that Facebook uses when it works with React. React – a popular front-end technology like AngularJS – is a Javascript framework, but it only works with the View layer, which means you have only the V in the MVC – Model-View-Controller – architecture. React gives you the template language and a few function hooks to render HTML. Since it is component based, you can compose an application with React, and just specify how you want your component to look. React will keep it updated; even the underlying data changes. The core principles of React are (1) Flexibility, (2) Efficiency and (3) Declarative code. As React is flexible, you can use it in several projects, create new apps, and even use it within the existing code base, without doing a rewrite.
What Is Flux?
We learned that React takes care of the V, or View, part of the MVC. Now, what about the M, or the Model, part? Flux, a programming pattern, takes care of that. It is the architecture responsible for creating data layers in JavaScript applications and building client-side web applications. Flux complements React’s Composable view components through its unidirectional data flow. You can also say that Flux is more of a pattern than a framework and it has four main components (we will go in depth later):

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/a-detailed-study-of-flux-the-reactjs-application-a?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Simple Task Scheduler With PHP

During a more or less large project, a situation may arise when the number of scheduled tasks (cron jobs) becomes so large that their support becomes a DevOps nightmare. To solve this problem, I came up with the idea of creating a PHP scheduler implementation, thereby making it a part of the project, allowing the tasks themselves to be part of its configuration. In this case, the necessary and sufficient number of cron jobs will be equal to one.
Some time ago, I was able to develop a module for event planning. It was just a simplified version of Google/Apple Calendar for users of the application. For storing the dates and rules regarding the repetition of events, it was decided to use the iCalendar format (RFC 5545), which allows one line to describe a schedule for repeating an event, while taking into account the days of the week, months, the number of repetitions, and much more. A few examples:

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/simple-task-scheduler-on-php?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Building an Angular 5 Application Step-By-Step

In this article, we will be building an Angular 5 application from scratch with step-by-step configuration and explanation. This single page application will be created using an Angular CLI command with different Angular modules integrated into it, such as RouterModule, HttpClientModule, AppRoutingModule, and FormsModule. The application will have a sample login page styled with Bootstrap and a user dashboard page. Once the user is authenticated successfully, they will be redirected to the dashboard page where they can see a list of users.
What’s New in Angular 5
Angular 5 applications are faster, lighter, and easy to use. They have material design capabilities to build beautiful and intuitive UIs. A new HttpClientModulewas introduced which is a complete rewrite of the existing HttpModule. It now supports TypeScript 2.4.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/building-angular5-application-step-by-step?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

React Is Taking Over Front-End Development

Selecting a JavaScript framework for your web application is a tough task. Especially when you have a plethora of convincing frameworks to choose from, including Angular, Backbone, Node, Ember, and the newest addition to the impressive list, Vue.js. You also have React.js – a JavaScript library that witnessed an immense growth in the past few years. Statistics show that front-end developers have wholeheartedly adopted this lightweight framework, forgoing other available options.
Source: http://stateofjs.com/2016/frontend/

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/react-is-taking-over-front-end-development-why?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Creating a Chat Application Using React and ASP.NET Core – Part 1

In this blog series, I’m going to create a small chat application using React and ASP.NET Core, to learn more about React and to learn how React behaves in an ASP.NET Core project during development and deployment. This Series is divided into 5 parts, which should cover all relevant topics:

React Chat Part 1: Requirements and Setup
React Chat Part 2: Creating the UI and React Components
React Chat Part 3: Adding Websockets Using SignalR
React Chat Part 4: Authentication and Storage
React Chat Part 5: Deployment to Azure

I also set-up a GitHub repository where you can follow the project. Feel free to share your ideas about that topic in the comments below or in issues on GitHub. Because I’m still learning React, please tell me about significant and conceptual errors by dropping a comment or by creating an Issue on GitHub. Thanks.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/creating-a-chat-application-using-react-and-aspnet?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev

Instant Progressive Web Apps

PWAs (Progressive Web Apps) are an extremely hot topic right now. In case you haven’t been following the PWA buzz, the idea is that it’s a web app that behaves like a native app. When they are first loaded in a user’s browser, they behave like a normal responsive web app, but users can install them to their home screen just like native apps. At which point, they can behave as “offline-first" apps. Parts of this have been available for quite some time, but the concept of PWA brings a lot of little things under a single umbrella.
Deploying as a Progressive Web App
Out of the box, your app is ready to be deployed as a progressive web app (PWA). That means that users can access the app directly in their browser, but once the browser determines that the user is frequenting the app, it will "politely" prompt the user to install the app on their home screen. Once installed on the home screen, the app will behave just like a native app. It will continue to work while offline, and if the user launches the app, it will open without the browser’s navigation bar. If you were to install the native and PWA versions of your app side by side, you would be hard-pressed to find the difference – especially on newer devices.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/instant-progressive-web-apps?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dzone%2Fwebdev