Monitoring Errors in WordPress

WordPress is an open source blogging and website creation tool written in PHP and MySQL. It is a highly flexible content management system (CMS) that enables you to build and manage your website using just your web browser. According to a W3Techs survey, WordPress is used by 31.8% of all websites.
WordPress sites generate errors that can negatively affect users, but they are not reported in tools like Google Analytics. You need to examine server-side logs to determine how often they happen. These errors are not just generated by WordPress, but by the dozens of plugins and custom themes that businesses add. Common WordPress errors experienced by users include the “white screen of death," "internal server error," "connection timed out," and many more.

Link: https://dzone.com/articles/monitoring-errors-in-wordpress

WordPress.com

Hey! Chris here, with a big thanks to WordPress, for not just their sponsorship here the last few months, but for being a great product for so many sites I’ve worked on over the years. I’ve been a web designer and developer for the better part of two decades, and it’s been a great career for me.
I’m all about learning. The more you know, the more you’re capable of doing and the more doors open for you, so …
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Link: https://css-tricks.com/wordpress-com/

Do You Need to Know React as a WordPress Developer?

This article on whether you need to know React as a WordPress developer was originally published by Torque Magazine, and is reproduced here with permission.
The new WordPress content editing system Gutenberg will be powering the WordPress post editor in WordPress 5.0. Gutenberg is a “block-based” editor. When creating content, everything is a block. If you have a post that is one paragraph, one header, and then two paragraphs, that’s four blocks.
Gutenberg comes with a set of default “core” blocks — paragraph, header, recent posts, image, blockquote, etc. If you’re using Gutenberg to create content, you use those blocks or custom blocks that are provided by WordPress plugins you install on your site.
Gutenberg is a JavaScript-driven interface. Specifically, it is built using Facebook’s open-source user interface library “React”. This post explains a little bit about creating your own custom blocks for use in the Gutenberg editor using JavaScript. You do not have to use JavaScript to create blocks. Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) recently announced a neat looking system for creating custom blocks with PHP.
What Is React?
In front-end development, the least performant things you do are reading and writing from the DOM. A very hard thing to do, consistently across browsers, is referencing and updating the DOM. React provides a better system for this, by implementing a reactive programming model and a virtual DOM abstraction.
Instead of interacting with the DOM directly, for example using jQuery.html() or jQuery.val(), React creates a virtual representation of the DOM. We call this a virtual DOM or VDOM. The VDOM is a JavaScript object that represents the structure of the DOM. Whenever your React code communicates to React a change in any of the data, the VDOM is recalculated. After that React calculates the difference between the DOM as it existed before the change and after the change. Then React (really ReactDOM or React Native) updates just the parts of the DOM that needs changed. How it does this doesn’t matter really.
How Is React Being Used in Gutenberg?
React is a library for creating reusable components. Because they are reusable, we can compose interfaces out of components. It is an open-source project created at Facebook.

Everything is a block. Text, images, galleries, widgets, shortcodes, and even chunks of custom HTML, no matter if it’s added by plugins or otherwise. You should only have to learn to master a single interface: the block interface, and then you know how to do everything. – Gutenberg Handbook

Blocks are the basic unit of Gutenberg. We compose content out of one or more blocks.
Components are the atomic unit of React, we compose React apps out of components. Gutenberg is created with React, so each block is composed of one or more components.
It’s important to note, and I’ll cover this more in this series of posts, but Gutenberg adds a thin abstraction layer over React. In our Gutenberg code, we’ll use wp.createElement instead of React.createElement. It works the same, but when React’s API changes, WordPress can decide when to support those changes and provide a backward-compatibility wrapper or decided not to.
This is good planning for the future, but for now, it’s just React.
The post Do You Need to Know React as a WordPress Developer? appeared first on SitePoint.

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/do-you-need-to-know-react-as-a-wordpress-developer/

Styling the Gutenberg Columns Block

WordPress 5.0 is quickly approaching, and the new Gutenberg editor is coming with it. There’s been a lot of discussion in the WordPress community over what exactly that means for users, designers, and developers. And while Gutenberg is sure to improve the writing experience, it can cause a bit of a headache for developers who now need to ensure their plugins and themes are updated and compatible.
One of the clearest ways you can make sure your theme is …
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Link: https://css-tricks.com/styling-the-gutenberg-columns-block/

Jetpack’s Social Integration Features

One of the many things we use Jetpack for here on CSS-Tricks is all of its features related to social media integration. For example, Jetpack can automatically share published content to different social media accounts simultaneously, add sharing buttons to your site’s theme, and allow for social login on the comment form. There is even more than that, but let’s dig into these three as we use them.

Auto-Sharing Posts
I like the idea that everything we published goes out …
The post Jetpack’s Social Integration Features appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: https://css-tricks.com/jetpacks-social-integration-features/

A Basic WooCommerce Setup to Sell T-Shirts

WooCommerce is a powerful eCommerce solution for WordPress sites. If you’re like me, and like working with WordPress and have WordPress-powered sites already, WooCommerce is a no-brainer for helping you sell things online on those sites. But even if you don’t already have a WordPress site, WooCommerce is so good I think it would make sense to spin up a WordPress site so you could use it for your eCommerce solution.

Personally, I’ve used WooCommerce a number of times to …
The post A Basic WooCommerce Setup to Sell T-Shirts appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Link: https://css-tricks.com/a-basic-woocommerce-setup-to-sell-t-shirts/

Delivering WordPress in 7KB

Over the past six months, I’ve become increasingly interested in the topic of web sustainability. The carbon footprint of the Internet was not something I used to give much thought to, which is surprising considering my interest in environmental issues and the fact that my profession is web-based.

The web in a warming world
As a brief recap, I attended MozFest in London last year. In between sessions, I was scanning a noticeboard to see what was coming up, and …
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Link: https://css-tricks.com/delivering-wordpress-in-7kb/

Pagely: Managed WordPress Hosting on Amazon Web Services

Dedicated WordPress hosting is the new black. The last five years saw a rapid rise in the numbers of providers that offer WordPress-focused hosting solutions. Pagely sticks out from this competition. Pagely: The Fast Are The Enemy of The Slow Why does Pagely stick out from the competition, you will undoubtedly ask. The answer is…

Link: https://www.noupe.com/business-online/pagely-managed-wordpress-hosting-aws.html